Burkitts Reef Dive Site

Bargara, Bundaberg Area

Located in front of the town of Bargara, near Bundaberg, Burkitts Reef is a popular shore diving site that always provides a few surprises. The reef fringes the headland and varies in depth from two to eight metres and is covered in lovely hard corals. Nudibranchs are a feature of this reef, and divers will see hundreds of them, but also common are moray eels, wobbegongs, stingrays, crayfish and olive sea snakes. Typical reef fish include angelfish, butterflyfish, scorpionfish, wrasse and lionfish, but Burkitts Reef is also visited by pelagic fish so don’t be surprised to see trevally, barracuda and even queenfish.

Burkitts Reef
Bargara, Bundaberg Area
Queensland
Australia

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Hallorans Hill Conservation Park

Atherton, Tablelands Area
Free Entry
This park, in the middle of the township of Atherton, protects eucalypt forest and a remnant of the endangered mabi forest on an extinct volcanic cone. The cone is part of the legacy of the Atherton Tableland's fiery geological past.

Herberton

Herberton, Tablelands Area
This historic tin mining town on the banks of the Wild River is the oldest town on the Atherton Tablelands. Buildings include a wonderful collection of Queensland architectural styles, from churches to public buildings and large houses with wide verandahs.

Hasties Swamp National Park

Atherton, Tablelands Area
Free Entry
A birdwatcher's delight, this park is a large seasonal wetland renowned for its diverse range of resident and migratory birds. At least 220 bird species have been recorded, mainly in the wetland and open woodland.

Tolga

Tolga, Tablelands Area
Tolga is within approximately eight kilometres from Atherton, travelling through the rainforest canopied Kennedy Highway. Tolga presents a quaint little town with good examples of early Queensland architecture.

Wongabel State Forest

Atherton, Tablelands Area
Free Entry
This state forest protects a remnant of an endangered type of forest, known as mabi forest. Here, in 1903, red cedar seedlings were planted in the forest to replace mature trees which had been logged. Commercial plantations of hoop, kauri and Caribbean pine now grow beside native forest.
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