Indigenous Culture

Queensland is the only place in the world where both of Australia’s Indigenous cultures converge and flourish. Torres Strait and Aboriginal cultures date back over 40,000 years and many descendants still practice their traditions and customs today.

Whether it’s through dance, art or traditional feasts, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people proudly practice and preserve their cultures by sharing it with the next generation.

Immerse yourself in rich culture and history by experiencing Indigenous culture on your next Queensland holiday.

Aboriginal art

From rock paintings to contemporary lino prints and fashion, there are many ways to experiences Torres Strait and Aboriginal art in Queensland.

See contemporary Indigenous pieces at museums like QAGOMA in Brisbane or the Cairns Regional Art Gallery in Tropical North Queensland. Head to Birdsville, Betoota and Bedourie to see the Sand, Dirt and Gibbers artwork sprawled across hills and landscapes. Or, visit independent galleries like the Canopy Arts Centre or the Henderson Gallery to meet the artists and learn about their work.

Head outdoors and explore Carnarvon Gorge or the Quinkan Country in Laura to see authentic rock paintings drawn by Indigenous Aboriginal ancestors.

You can also get hands on and learn to paint, weave and dance with interactive tours and workshops.

Start exploring

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Cania Gorge National Park

Monto, North Burnett Area
Free Entry
Cania Gorge National Park preserves a valuable remnant of the Brigalow Belt country. Along with plant communities including brigalow forest, eucalypt woodland, cypress pine woodland, dry rainforest and grassland, you'll discover the sandstone landscapes of cliffs and fern-covered pools, where you might just spot a grazing rock wallaby, sunbathing rainbow skink, a hunting lace monitor, or hear the call of the dollarbirds.

Cape Tribulation, Daintree National Park

Daintree, Cairns Area
Free Entry
Cape Tribulation, in Daintree National Park, is famed for steep rainforested mountains sweeping down to long sandy beaches and turquoise coastal waters. One of the most biologically diverse areas in the world, this park is part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and the coastal waters are within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

Duaringa

Duaringa, Central Highlands Area
Duaringa is located 107 kilometres west of Rockhampton along the Capricorn Highway. It is a tiny settlement of less than 500 people which came into existence as a base camp for railway workers. Duaringa is one of the oldest townships in the region, with buildings dating back to the 1860s.

Bunya Mountains

Bunya Mountains, South Burnett Area
The South Burnett offers easy access to the majestic Bunya Mountains, which, at an elevation of over 1,100 metres above sea level, are the region’s high point. Less than an hour from either Maidenwell or Kingaroy, via Kumbia, this natural wonderland is an offshoot of the Great Dividing Range formed about 30 million years ago and shelters the largest ancient bunya pine forest in the world today.

Native Wells

Windorah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
The Native Wells, located approximately 90 kilometres west of Windorah on the Diamantina Development Road, offer a quick stop by the side of the road and an opportunity to view the native wells, and read a little bit about them on the Information board available.

Hook Island

Hook Island, Whitsunday Area
No visit to the Whitsundays is complete without seeing a few islands and Hook Island offers spectacular natural surroundings and excellent snorkelling and diving sites. The second largest island in the Cumberland group, it is 58 square kilometres in size and includes sheltered, picturesque bays, deep fjord-like inlets, ideal sailing and kayaking conditions, multiple moorings and safe anchorages, pristine fringing reefs, secluded beach campsites and the opportunity to see abundant wildlife including sea eagles, kites and ospreys, turtles, reef fish, dolphins, manta rays and humpback whales frolicking in Whitsunday Passage (between June to September).

Wujal Wujal

Cook Area
Wujal Wujal is the local Kuku-Yalanji clan name meaning ‘many falls’, highlighting the many sacred waterfalls in their landscape. This image also captures their multifaceted region of ranges, rivers and reef.

Expedition National Park

Taroom, Banana Area
Free Entry
Rugged gorges with towering sandstone cliffs, spectacular views of the Carnarvon ranges, and colourful wildflowers in late winter and spring, are highlights of this rugged outback park, which includes Robinson Gorge, Lonesome and Beilba sections.

Mount Scoria Conservation Park

Thangool, Banana Area
Free Entry
Mount Scoria Conservation Park in Queensland's brigalow belt features open woodlands with an open semi-evergreen vine thicket on rocky slopes and around the base of the mountain. Rising 150 m above the cultivated plains, Mount Scoria is a striking local landmark protected in Mount Scoria Conservation Park.

Charleville

Charleville, Murweh Area
Immortalised in Slim Dusty's song by the same name, Charleville is the largest town in Queensland's south west and is a hub for visitors and pastoralists alike. In the heart of 'mulga country', Charleville and surrounding pastoral properties are rich in history, flora and fauna.
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Indigenous tours

Go walkabout or learn to hunt with an Indigenous guide. An Indigenous tour will allow you to see things from the perspective of Queensland’s First People. Take a cultural tour of Brisbane to see significant artefacts and sites or walk through the Nudgee Waterholes and learn how live off the land.

Hunt for mud crabs and collect shellfish in Tropical North Queensland or learn the Dreamtime stories of Burleigh Heads National Park in Southern Gold Coast.

Cultural events & performances

Head to the Winds of Zenadth festival on Thursday Island in the Torres Strait to watch traditional dancing, singing and celebrations or trek to Laura to experience the earth-shaking performances at the Laura Aboriginal Dance Festival.

Looking for something a little more contemporary? Head to Yarabah, just a 50-minute drive south of Cairns and immerse yourself in music at the Yarabah Band Festival.

Or, get the best of both Indigenous cultures at the Cairns International Art Fair and see fashion shows, interactive skits and traditional song and dance performances.

From the Blog

Traditional bush tucker experiences

Tate a traditional kup murri (earth oven) cooked feast an hour from Townsville or learn to hunt and gather your own dinner in the Torres Strait, near Cairns and in Brisbane. From berries and jams to flour and meat, you can taste a variety of bush tucker cuisines and superfoods.

Prefer to fine dining? Head to the Daintree Rainforest and enjoy flame-lit dining and cultural entertainment while you nosh on traditionally inspired dishes. Or, go all out and treat yourself to a gourmet night out at an award-winning restaurant in Cairns.

Family-friendly Indigenous experiences

Experience the Corroboree at Dreamworld on the Gold Coast or treat your kids to boomerang throwing and art workshops at Tjapukai Aboriginal Cultural Park in Cairns.

Let the kids explore the beach and learn about traditional hunting and gathering practices with a personal Kuku Yalanji guide or hear the stories about Dreaming Mountain with a Jellurgal tour on the Gold Coast.

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