Girraween National Park camping

Ballandean, Southern Downs Area

Indicative Rate * AU$6.35 to AU$25.40

Girraween, meaning 'place of flowers', is a park of massive granite outcrops, large angular tors, and precariously balanced boulders. Spectacular wildflower displays splash colour among the granite in spring.

Castle Rock and Bald Rock Creek camping areas are in a pleasant open forest setting close to the information centre and walking tracks. Both cater for tent camping and camper trailers. Castle Rock camping area is more suitable for caravans and motorhomes.

Bush camping in remote sections of Girraween National Park is also permitted (restrictions apply). As sites are not identified by signs or markers, campers need good navigation skills and to practise minimal impact behaviour when using these areas.

Camping permits are required and fees apply. A tag with your booking number must be displayed at your camp site. Book your camp site and purchase your camping permit in advance. Bookings can be made on-line, over the counter or by phone.

Facilities

  • BBQ Facilities
  • Car park
  • Communal Shower
  • Open fireplace

Activities

  • Birdwatching
  • Camping
  • Hiking/Trekking
  • Off Road Driving

Other Information

Accessibility:

Accessible facilities available. Please contact operator for specific details.

Family Friendly:

Family friendly – please refer to operator's website for services and facilities.

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Moura

Moura, Banana Area
Moura is a central point and vibrant community for the people who serve its local industries – the farmers, growers and miners and their families that help to make Queensland great. Lying in the heart of the Dawson Valley, not far from the Dawson River, its parklands and public facilities, festivals and events, river fishing and water sports attract thousands of visitors each year.

Baralaba

Baralaba, Banana Area
Old fashioned values and friendly townsfolk are the hallmarks of Baralaba. Those traits and a stubborn streak for sticking around. More than a century of economic upheaval has threatened the town on many an occasion, but Baralaba locals are a stoic lot.

Goovigen

Goovigen, Banana Area
Goovigen is a small rural village in the region’s northern farming heartland. A short distance north-west of Jambin off the Burnett Highway, fewer than 300 people live in the town. The streets of Goovigen are as neat as a pin and the heritage buildings have been either restored to their former glory or updated for present needs.

Jambin

Jambin, Banana Area
A rural hub with a pub to service weary travellers, Jambin is on the Burnett Highway just south of Smoky Creek. Part of the Callide Valley, the town is wedged between the Callide Creek to the west and the highway to the east, making it a picturesque spot to stop.

Banana

Valentine Plains, Banana Area
Visitors are always a little baffled by the town’s unusual name, particularly as there isn’t a single banana tree in sight. A dun-coloured bullock is responsible for that. A favourite of local stockmen in the 1860s, Banana the bullock, so named for his yellowish colouring, would help herd wild cattle into holding yards.

Wowan

Wowan, Banana Area
In its heyday, Wowan was the dairy capital of the region. With more than 600 farmers on the job, the Dawson Valley Dairy Cooperative was topped up daily with fresh supplies of full cream milk, ready to ship off to towns and cities as far away as England.

Duaringa

Duaringa, Central Highlands Area
Duaringa is located 107 kilometres west of Rockhampton along the Capricorn Highway. The small town is the essence of a small rural community. Duaringa is the oldest township in Duaringa Shire with buildings dating back to the 1860s and a corner of the local hotel has been preserved to show how early pioneers lived.

150th Meridian

Moura, Banana Area
Free Entry
Located one kilometre east of Moura on the Dawson Highway, the 150th Meridian marker shows the position of the imaginary line (150 °E) on which Queensland (Eastern Standard) time is based. At the time of the equinox, a day is exactly 12 hours long anywhere on the Meridian line.

Thangool

Thangool, Banana Area
More than 130 years in the making, Thangool first opened to settlers, who tried it as a sheep run in the 1850s. Soon to fail, beef cattle were introduced and later, dairy and cotton took hold. Based on the success of these industries, a make-shift town sprang up.

Dululu

Dululu, Banana Area
The northern most town in the Banana region, Dululu is a junction point that divides the two southern arterials, Burnett Highway (A3) to the east and the Leichhardt Highway (A5) to the west. Both highways reveal untold adventures and this rural village is the start of them all – a launching pad to the region and perfect place to stop, rest and make your touring plans.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).