Diamantina National Park

Bedourie, Diamantina Area

Stretch your gaze across vast, treeless plains, over sand dunes and along river channels towards low ranges on the horizon. Camp in the shade of a coolabah tree, dreaming at night under endless starry skies of the Maiawali and Karuwali people and travellers along the mighty Diamantina River long ago.

Indigenous people understood this landscape—using the Diamantina River as a trading route and finding food in its grasslands, sand dunes, and sandstone ranges. Then came explorers ahead of pastoralists, stockmen and drovers, grazing livestock in good seasons on the highly-nutritious Mitchell grass.

Set out for an adventure through boom and bust country. Your first stop is the information centre at the Ranger Base to get your bearings. Then relax, canoe or birdwatch at beautiful seasonal lakes or permanent waterholes. Take a drive to Janet’s Leap lookout for a bird’s-eye view of Diamantina Gates or follow the Warracoota circuit drive to pastoral relics and learn about the landscapes of the channel country. Get your camera snapping to capture desert colours, amazing wildflowers, diverse wildlife and stunning sunsets across the plains.

Image credits:
Sunset—Chris Mitchell © Queensland Government
Ruins—Maxime Coquard © Tourism and Events Queensland
Lookout—© Chris Whitelaw

Facilities

  • Car park

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Augathella

Augathella, Murweh Area
Augathella, with its fascinating history of bushrangers, bullockies and bullock teams, has some memorable Outback experiences. Don’t just drive through – stop and enjoy Augathella’s colourful history, characters and humour.

Morven

Morven, Murweh Area
In 1859 on the mail route from Brisbane to Charleville, a small area was taken from the property Victoria Downs and set aside for public use and designated on maps and documents as 'Victoria Downs Reserve'.

Saddliers Waterhole and Hamburg Creek

Morven, Murweh Area
Free Entry
With a population of less than 250, Morven is thought to be named after a mountain and town of the same name in Scotland. Captain T.J. Saddlier and his wife arrived in the area in the 1860s and camped on a deep waterhole of nearby Hamburg Creek.
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