Diving in Queensland

There are endless opportunities to explore the waters of the Great Barrier Reef all year-round. From snorkelling off the shore of an island to exploring the outer reef on a day trip. 

Discover sparkling blue seas set against crystal white sand and tropical islands. This part of Australia is home to a colourful kaleidoscope of reefs, shoals, coral cays and intriguing shipwrecks teeming with tropical marine life.

Queensland offers open water, wreck and night diving, specialist dive and liveaboard tours in the Great Barrier Reef, Coral Sea and the cooler, subtropical waters of Southern Queensland.

First-time divers can learn to dive with an introductory ocean or resort dive, or at one of Queensland’s world-class specialist diver training facilities.


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Holmes Reef Dive Site

Horn Island, Torres Area
Holmes Reef is the closest Coral Sea Reef to Cairns and often visited on special expeditions to the Northern Coral Sea. The reef is actually split into two sections, known as East Holmes and West Holmes, and both have large lagoons with safe anchorages.

Henderson Rock Dive Site

Moreton Island, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
Henderson Rock, on the eastern side of Moreton Island, is one of Brisbane's better and less frequented dive sites. With lots of deep ledges, overhangs and caves hiding behind kelp, these mysterious rocks have many secrets to be discovered.

Boat Rock Dive Site

North Stradbroke Island, Redland City Area
Boat Rock is an action packed dive site located off Brisbane’s North Stradbroke Island. While always a sensational dive, it is the least dive site in the area as it is generally washed by strong currents, is a tricky spot to anchor and is a site best suited to experienced divers.

Turtle Bommie

Cairns, Cairns Area
Turtles are often encountered on the dive sites off Cairns and a good place to encounter one is Turtle Bommie. This magic dive site is located off Saxon Reef, with the terrain made up of coral gardens and a collection of small and large bommies in depths to 15 metres.

Fish Bowl Dive Site

Cairns, Cairns Area
Divers wanting to encounter a great variety of reef fish are highly recommended to visit the Fish Bowl. This lovely dive site is located off Cairns and situated on the western side of Hastings Reef. The terrain at Fish Bowl is a mix of coral gardens and coral heads that form a bowl shape, but divers will also find gutters, ledges and walls in depths to 18 metres.

Heron Bommie

Heron Island, Gladstone Area
Heron Island’s most famous dive site is the always spectacular Heron Bommie. Located just outside the harbour, this group of six bommies is found on a sandy slope in depths from 8 metres to 18 metres. The bommies themselves are colourful, decorated with corals, but are often ignored as divers are two busy marvelling at the fish, turtles and other marine life.

Shag Rock Dive Site

North Stradbroke Island, Redland City Area
Free Entry
Shag Rock is located off Brisbane’s North Stradbroke Island and is one of those all-weather sites that is very under-appreciated at times. Surrounding Shag Rock are rocky reefs and coral gardens in depths from six to 20 metres.

Roy Rufus Artificial Reef Dive Site

Hervey Bay, Fraser Coast Area
The most popular dive site in Hervey Bay is the Roy Rufus Artificial Reef. Located off the eastern side of Big Woody Island, this large artificial reef was started in 1968 and covers a wide area in depths to 18 metres.

False Entrance Dive Site

Cairns, Cairns Area
A large bay cutting into the reef edge at Osprey Reef, which looks like another lagoon entry point, gave this site its name of False Entrance. This bay has gutters and bommies for divers to explore in depths to 30 metres, before coming to a wall that drops into the abyss.

Barolin Rocks Dive Site

Bargara, Bundaberg Area
Free Entry
Head to the Woongarra Marine Park on the outskirts of Bundaberg to find some of the most brilliant and easy-to-access shore diving in Queensland. There's something different everywhere you look - turtles, rays, sea snakes, nudibranchs, moray eels, a wide variety of reef fish and coral and even wobbegong sharks.
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