Long Island

With 13 kilometres of extensive walking tracks, stunning lookouts, protected bays and beautiful secluded beaches, Long Island is well worth a visit. Much of the island is national park and you can enjoy bush walks, exploring the fringing coral reef, snorkelling off the beaches or relaxing under the coconut palms. There are private bungalows and a few resorts and they recommend you check availability and access details before arriving at the island.

Long Island is nine kilometres in length and the nearest island to the mainland. The Whitsunday islands, officially named the Cumberland group, are part of Australia's largest offshore island chain and the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage area. These continental islands were formed when changing sea levels drowned the mainland mountain range in the last Ice Age. Due to the shallow depth and warm temperature of the waters, beautiful fringing reefs have grown up around the islands with outstanding coral cover and variety. The islands support an abundant marine and bird life, and from May to September the region is an important calving ground for migrating humpback whales.

Long Island, Whitsunday Area
Queensland
Australia

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Lake McKenzie

Fraser Island, Fraser Coast Area
Free Entry
There are many different aspects to Fraser Island, but the awe-inspiring beauty of Lake McKenzie makes it probably the most visited natural site on the island. It is a ‘perched’ lake, which means it contains only rainwater, no groundwater, is not fed by streams and does not flow to the ocean.

Eurong

Fraser Island, Fraser Coast Area
With the magnificent 75 Mile Beach as its main road, Eurong, on World-Heritage listed Fraser Island is an idyllic destination for four wheel drive enthusiasts, nature lovers, beach bums and adventure seekers of all kinds.

Lake Wabby

Fraser Island, Fraser Coast Area
Free Entry
Lake Wabby is relatively close to the ocean side of Fraser Island and unlike the other lakes, it supports several varieties of fish. It is known as both a window lake and a barrage lake. Window lakes form when the ground level falls below the water table.
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