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Coastal Island Safaris

Multiple Locations

North Stradbroke Island, the world’s second largest sand island, lies within easy reach of tourists visiting Brisbane and the coast. It offers Coral Sea beaches of pristine white sand, wildlife and rich forests, wetlands and spring fed lakes. Coastal Island Safaris run day tours of the island.

After leaving Cleveland, as the ferry crosses Moreton Bay, spot whales in season, dugongs and dolphins, pelicans and sea eagles.

After arrival at Dunwich, the exciting four wheel drive component of the tour is exhilarating but safe. The first sand track drive ends with a sweeping panorama of coastal islands, distant Brisbane, the hinterlands and border mountains.

Visit spring-fed lakes, teaming with bird life. Via 18 Mile Swamp, a gorgeous wetland of water lilies, to Main Beach, a prime whale-watching spot in June-November each year. Stop near Point Lookout at the North Gorge Walk, a maintained track through native flora, filled with birdsong, to a rocky outcrop with views far out to sea. Next stop is Flinder's Beach, for some fishing, swimming or simply enjoy the barbecue feast for lunch. The pleasant drive home winds past a tree-sheltered cove where local boats anchor, to meet the ferry for the return crossing.

Activities

  • Off Road Driving
  • Swimming

Other Information

Family Friendly:

Family friendly – please refer to operator's website for services and facilities.

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Free Entry
The Boondall Wetlands lie on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. The wetlands include more than 1000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. This track passes through mangroves fringing the shores of Moreton Bay and the banks of Nudgee Creek. Birdlife abounds in the mangroves and a bird hide overlooks the tidal flats at the creek mouth. If you walk at low tide you will notice that these flats are vital feeding grounds for shorebirds. High and low tides in the mangroves reveal two very different worlds.

Boondall Wetlands Reserve

Boondall, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
Boondall Wetlands lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe and includes more than 1,000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, saltmarshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. The Indigenous Australians have lived at Boondall Wetlands for a long time and continue to have links with this land. The Nurri Millen art totems in the wetlands celebrate this culture. Boondall Wetlands has a diversity of wildlife. Mammals that live there include flying foxes, bats, possums and squirrel gliders. There are also a variety of frogs, reptiles and butterflies to be found within the reserve. An amazing variety of birdlife can also be found throughout the diverse vegetation types including mistletoe birds, tawny frogmouths, eastern curlews, kingfishers, rainbow bee-eaters, grass owls and wrens. At low tide, shorebirds feed on the mudflats. Cormorants, darters, egrets, ibis and herons can be seen year round. The Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre offers a range of displays and activities on the environmental and cultural heritage of the reserve for park visitors and organised groups. A track map brochure for Boondall Wetlands Reserve can be obtained from the Brisbane City Council Contact Centre.

Brisbane Lookout Mount Coot-tha

Mount Coot-tha, Brisbane Area
  • Free WiFi
Free Entry
Brisbane will come at you with riverside vistas around almost every corner, but it takes a short drive from the city centre and a few twists and turns up Sir Samuel Griffith Scenic Drive to find the city's best angle. Brisbane Lookout Mount Coot-tha provides a remarkable vantage point to view Brisbane and beyond. Set amongst beautifully manicured gardens and nestled in the natural bushland of Brisbane Forest Park, is the Summit Restaurant and Bar, Function Centre, Kuta Cafe, Gift Shop and Observation Deck. Interpretive facilities pointing out well-known Brisbane landmarks are located on the observation deck. On a clear day, you can take in striking views of Brisbane City and right out to Moreton Bay. By night, the spectacle switches on with the city lights and star-lit skies. There are also a handful of bushwalks around the vicinity of the Lookout. Take the Aboriginal Track down to Slaughter's Falls and keep your eye out for some original Aboriginal art. Mt Coot-tha is also scattered with picnic areas fully equipped with gas barbecues.

D'Aguilar National Park

The Gap, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
D'Aguilar National Park is a huge, diverse park of scribbly gums and lush rainforest, sprawling over the hills and Mountains at Brisbane's back door. From the parks information centre join in a fun and informative Connect with Nature activity, or explore the wildlife displays at the South East Queensland Wildlife Centre. Enjoy great lookouts, walking tracks and picnic areas, also remote secluded camp sites for experienced walkers and navigators. At Jolly's lookout (wheelchair accessible), cook a barbecue while taking in the views over Samford Valley and listening to early morning birdsong. At Boombana, take a short rainforest walk among strangler figs and climbing vines. In the northern section of the park inspect the remains of the antique sawmill in the Gantry day-use area. Fit walkers can hike the Somerset trail to enjoy views of Somerset and Wivenhoe lakes. The rockpool at Rocky Hole is surrounded by eucalypt forest and is a great place for a cooling swim in summer. Campers can stay at Neurum Creek or the more remote Archer campground (four-wheel-drive access only). This huge park is a treasure trove close to Brisbane, offering a circuit drive of 90 minutes through a range of natural habitats.
Free Entry
Samford Conservation Park and Bunyaville Conservation Park protect a community of spotted gums found only in the Brisbane region. Dry rainforest and freshwater ponds along seasonally flowing creeks also feature. Enjoy the Bunyaville track. Have a barbecue at the wheelchair-accessible picnic area. Ride your horse or bicycle. Dogs on leash are allowed, except where signs prohibit them. Education Queensland operates an environmental education centre in Bunyaville Conservation Park, with informative programs for schools and the public (bookings are required).

The Seaway Dive Site

Southport, Gold Coast Area
Free Entry
The Seaway is the most popular shore diving site in Queensland, and is found at the mouth of the Nerang River at Southport. There are several different areas that can be dived at The Seaway, with the Short Pipe and Sand Pipe area the most popular, and the easiest to access. In depths to 15 metres divers will be amazed at the variety and amount of fish life found at this site - schools of trevally, mulloway, gropers, moray eels, turtles, stingrays, wobbegongs, stonefish, scorpionfish and a host of tropical fish species. A feature of The Seaway are all the unusual species that can be seen, including sea horses, cuttlefish, pineapplefish, nudibranchs, dragonets, anglerfish, velvetfish and pipefish.

Gold Coast Seaway Dive Site

Southport, Gold Coast Area
Free Entry
The Gold Coast Seaway offers diving for the beginner to advanced. There are two pipes that protrude from the Southern Seaway wall. This dive site is divided into four main areas: South Wall (including the Sand Bypass Pipe and the Short Pipe) - great marine biodiversity; North Wall - schools of pelagic fish, wobbegong and whaler sharks; South-West Wall - beach entry and home to little critters; Wave Break Island - excellent for snorkelling, intro and learn to dive.

Scottish Prince Dive Site

Southport, Gold Coast Area
Free Entry
The Scottish Prince, 800 metres off the Gold Coast's Southport Spit, features the wreck of a three steel-masted, 64 metre iron barque ship. The Scottish Prince sank as it was sailing from Glasgow, Scotland to Brisbane with a cargo of whiskey, mousetraps, linen and other assorted cargo, with only the hull of the ship remaining. These days, the Scottish Prince is covered in soft corals and sponges, making it a haven for crayfish, shovelnose rays, brown-banded catsharks and wobbegong sharks, and other tropical fish. There isn't much access to the inside of the wreck, however a variety of marine life will pop their heads out to say hello. The Scottish Prince is protected under the Commonwealth Historic Shipwreck Act, so make sure you take nothing but photos and memories.

Nudgee Beach

Nudgee Beach, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
Nudgee Beach is the closest beach to the Brisbane Central Business District. It offers a bike track that runs close by the Schulz Canal itself, and eventually reaches Toombul Shopping Centre (and from there, many other parts of Brisbane). Nudgee Beach is surrounded by numerous mangroves and the built up area is bordered to its north and west by the Boondall Wetlands.

Fort Lytton National Park

Lytton, Brisbane Area
From AU$6.05 - 6.05
Fort Lytton National Park protects the birthplace of Queensland's military history. From 1881 to 1945 this classic coastal fortress was the focus of Queensland's defence activity. One of several built around Australia's coast in the nineteenth century for protection from invasion, the well-preserved pentagonal fort is concealed behind grassy embankments and surrounded by a water-filled moat. Join a guided tour and immerse yourself in the fascinating history of the fort and its restored guns, which were designed to fire and disappear! Learn more detail in the museum. Enjoy a picnic with a background of scenic river views. Fort Lytton is half an hour’s drive from the centre of Brisbane.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).