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Adventure North Australia

Multiple Locations

Cooktown is one of Australia's exciting new destinations. If you are into history, botany, adventure, getting away from it all, seeing the rainforest and the outback or four-wheel driving then this is the trip for you. There are a range of one, two and three day tours available from Cairns, Northern Beaches and Port Douglas.

Locally owned and operated, Adventure North Australia operate purpose built four-wheel drive tours to Cooktown via the Daintree Coast, Cape Tribulation and the return journey is via the Mulligan Highway, the outback of Far North Queensland.

The four-wheel drive tours offer diverse scenery as you travel on one of Australia's most scenic coastal drives along the Daintree-Cape Tribulation coast where the Great Barrier Reef meets the Rainforest.

Traverse mountain ranges and river crossings through some of Australia's remote region of Tropical North Queensland. The experienced, professional and friendly driver-guides have incredible enthusiasm and extensive knowledge of the region around Cape Tribulation and Cooktown.

They look forward to welcoming you on board.

Activities

  • Bush Tucker
  • Bushwalking
  • Guided Walks
  • Off Road Driving

Other Information

Children:

Children are welcome, however the tours are not recommended for children under seven years.

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Mount Cook National Park

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
This park features the rugged Mount Cook, which provides a scenic backdrop to the town of Cooktown. Rainforest and tropical woodlands with a heath understorey cover the upper slopes and sheltered gullies. Mount Cook was named after Lieutenant James Cook, navigator and explorer, who had repaired the Endeavour in 1770 where Cooktown now stands, after damaging it on the reefs off Cape Tribulation. Take the steep two kilometre walk to the lookout for scenic views over the Great Barrier Reef and coastline. Climb one kilometre further to Mount Cook's summit. See large granite boulders covered with ferns. Look for tree snakes and lace monitors. Take binoculars for birdwatching.

Mount Whitfield Conservation Park

Cairns, Cairns Area
Free Entry
The rainforest-clad slopes of the Whitfield Range form a dramatic backdrop to Cairns, offering bushwalking opportunities close to the city. Walking tracks through Mount Whitfield Conservation Park climb through shady rainforest gullies and dry open forest and grasslands with cycads to the top of Mount Lumley Hill. Enjoy the short but steep 1.5 kilometre Red Arrow circuit walk through rainforest up to a lookout with views scenic views over the Cairns coastline. Add the more demanding Blue Arrow circuit for a 6.6 kilometre (four to five hour) walk, with an optional 400 metre sidetrack to a lookout at Mount Lumley Hill (325 metres), offering expansive views to the Cairns hinterland and out to Green Island. Picnic at the lookout between your circuit walks. Look for mound-building brush-turkeys, orange-footed scrubfowl and graceful honeyeaters .
Free Entry
In this park, an imposing mountain range of massive granite boulders is home to unique wildlife and rich in Aboriginal culture. Located near Cooktown at the northern end of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Black Mountain is imposing mountain range of black granite boulders, some the size of houses, stacked seemingly precariously on one another. The wet tropics and drier savanna woodland regions meet in this park, and an unusual range of wildlife finds refuge here, including species that are found nowhere else. Known as Kalkajaka (meaning 'place of spear'), Black Mountain is an important meeting place for the Eastern Kuku Yalanji Aboriginal people and is the source of many Dreaming stories. Stop at the Black Mountain lookout on the Mulligan Highway on the eastern side of the crest of the Black Mountain boulder field. Signs at the lookout tell of the geology, natural environment, culture and history of the area. There is no other access to the park. Do not risk injury by venturing onto the boulder field. People have been injured and have died trying to climb Black Mountain.

Snapper Island, Hope Islands National Park

Port Douglas, Douglas Area
Free Entry
This high continental island, close to Port Douglas, boasts lush vine forests, dense eucalypt forest, mangroves and white sandy beaches. The islands and surrounding waters and fringing reefs are within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Snapper Island is within easy reach of the coast by kayak or small boat, and is popular for camping, birdwatching and small boat fishing. Join a guided kayaking trip with a commercial tour operator to paddle around the island and land on seemingly-remote beaches. Explore the short walking track to a rocky ridge to the northern side of the island. Spend the night bush camping and have the island all to yourself. Drop in a line and try your luck fishing for mackerel and other reef fish in this popular angling spot for small boats.

Mount Lewis National Park

Julatten, Mareeba Area
Free Entry
Mount Lewis, one high rainforest-clad mountains of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, is a treasure trove of unique and endemic wildlife. The area between the Mount Lewis and Atherton Tableland is especially diverse. The beautiful upland rainforest dates back to the evolution of flowering plants on earth. Some flowers are indicative of Australia's link with the ancient landmass of Gondwana. Drive a four-wheel-drive or ride a mountain bike on the 56 kilometre (return) Mount Lewis Road. Starting at the entrance to the park, the rainforest drive climbs to over 1200 metres before following the contours around the chain of peaks that form the watershed of the Mossman and Mitchell rivers. Picnic at one of the creek crossings. Look for the Mount Lewis spiny crayfish in the creeks and blue-faced parrot-finches in grassy clearings and glades. Spot red-bellied black snakes basking on the road and huge blue earthworms coming to the ground's surface during wet weather.

Lizard Island Group National Park

Lizard Island, Cook Area
Free Entry
Set in a turquoise sea, the six high islands and islets of this park are surrounded by coral reefs, fringed by mangroves and sandy beaches, and cloaked in grasslands, woodlands and wind-sheared heaths. The island group lies midway between the coast and the outer barrier reef, within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Lizard, the main island, has several idyllic, sheltered, sandy beaches with easy access to picturesque coral and clam gardens. Snorkel in the sheltered, shallow waters of Watsons Bay and discover the famed Clam Gardens. Following in the footsteps of the famous explorer, climb the steep track to Cook's Look for breath-taking views over the islands and reefs. Walk to Blue Lagoon on the other side of the island for secluded swimming and snorkelling. Bush camp near the beach at peaceful Watsons Bay. Learn about a tragic episode in the island's history at Mary Watson's cottage ruin. Look for the yellow-spotted monitor, for which Lizard Island is named, and birdwatch around the island's beaches and walking tracks. Visit the Lizard Island Research Station during their tour times and relax at the resort's Marlin Bar (not open every day).

Mossman Gorge Centre

Mossman, Douglas Area
Visit Mossman Gorge and experience the Daintree World Heritage Rainforest with pristine waterfalls, mountains and vivid flora and fauna, all the while getting lost in its enchanting stories and rich Indigenous heritage. Begin your trip by paying a visit to the Mossman Gorge Centre. Peruse the Indigenous art work, enjoy a light refreshment at Mayi café and book yourself onto one of the award-winning Ngadiku Dreamtime Walks, The walks are conducted by the traditional owners of the Gorge, the Kuku Yalanji people. Be taken on a journey steeped in heritage as you uncover their ancient culture and traditions. After a visit to the Centre, a shuttle bus will transport you into the heart of the Gorge where the adventure begins through this unique wilderness. Whether at your own pace on one of the self guided walks through the National Park or with an expert local indigenous guide on the Dreamtime Walks the Gorge is guaranteed to leave you enthused and inspired.

Wet Tropics

Mossman, Douglas Area
Free Entry
The Wet Tropics World Heritage property extends from Townsville to Cooktown on the north-east coast of Queensland and covers almost 900,000 hectares. The area is a region of spectacular scenery with fast-flowing rivers, deep gorges, numerous waterfalls and mountain summits providing expansive rainforest views. One of the largest rainforest wilderness areas in Australia centres around the Daintree River Valley. This is the only area in the world where two World Heritage listed areas meet, the rainforest grows right down to the fringing World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef. The area includes the following: - Daintree National Park - Barron Gorge National Park - Wooroonooran National Park Many different opportunities are provided that allow visitors to experience the Wet Tropics, including luxury accommodation nestled in rainforest; four-wheel-drive tours; bird and crocodile spotting tours. Extensive bushwalking options include the Wet Tropics Great Walk, one of Queensland’s new world-class long distance walking tracks. It extends for 110km highlighting the natural and cultural features of this unique area. The Wet Tropics is home to 30 percent of Australia’s marsupial species, including the small musky rat-kangaroo, which is the most primitive surviving kangaroo species. The Wet Tropics also provides habitat for numerous endemic species of both fauna and flora. There are at least 390 species of plants that can be classified as rare or very restricted and of these, 74 are regarded as threatened. Aboriginal occupation of the area is believed to date back 50,000 years to the earliest human occupation of Australia. The district was a rich environment for the Aboriginal hunter-gatherers who lived there. About 16 different groups occupied the area and the Wet Tropics area continues to hold great significance for the local Aboriginal communities who identify as rainforest people.

Cobia Hole Dive Site

Cairns, Cairns Area
Free Entry
Located off Lizard Island, on the Great Barrier Reef near Cairns, Cobia Hole is a pinnacle of rocks covered with marine organism including sponges, soft coral, coralliamorpharians, feather stars, sea stars, sea squirts, shrimps, crabs and gobies. Look for sea whips, gorgonian fans and stinging hydroids. Hovering bream can often be seen, as well as circling pelagic barracuda or trevally. Large turtles, toadfish and estuary cod. Explore the sea grasses and algae on the nearby sand.
Free Entry
Nature's Powerhouse Visitor Information Centre at the Cooktown Botanic Gardens provides all the information you need to explore this site. Established in 1878 as the Gallop Botanic Reserve, it comprises a formal botanic garden, and a substantial natural forest and ocean frontage. It commemorates the work of naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander on HMS Endeavour who collected and documented botanical specimens from the district in 1770. A century later Cooktown was the main port for the Palmer River gold fields. Thousands of Chinese landed here, later settling in Cooktown. The Chinese had market gardens here and produced charcoal from timber felled on site. After the declaration of a botanical reserve, a road was built, a nursery established and trees and shrubs ordered from the Acclimatisation Society in Brisbane. During the 1890s, stone lined paths, stone pitched pools and stone-work bridges were built and the nursery supplied ornamental trees for Cooktown. The gardens suffered in the 1907 cyclone, were closed after World War One and were not rebuilt until 1979. The gardens now boast an exotic plant section, a palm garden, a native plants section and 'Solander's Garden' which is used by tourists and locals for recreational and educational purposes.
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