4
4

RnR White Water Rafting, Cairns, Queensland

Multiple Locations

Tropical North Queensland is renowned for Reef and Rainforest and the most exciting and fun way to discover this pristine rainforest is white water rafting.

RnR White Water Rafting, based in Cairns, is renowned as Australia's white water rafting specialists, with over 20 years experience in Tropical North Queensland. RnR has established a reputation synonymous with safety, service and, above all, fun. Rafting in North Queensland has the advantage of tropical water temperatures and ease of access to complement breathtaking scenery and rapids.

Experience the thrills and excitement of white water rafting through World Heritage Rainforest and magnificent gorges of the Barron and Tully Rivers in North Queensland. Their half day Barron River Rafting experience is great if you are limited for time or can be combined with other activities to maximise your day. The world famous Tully River provides the most exciting day anyone could ask for. Hone your rafting skills on foaming white water traversing through World Heritage listed rainforest, numerous waterfalls and basalt formations. Enjoy an Aussie barbecue lunch riverside and relive your experience over a cold beer with some newly found friends at our Cafe stop in the afternoon.

Activities

  • Lessons/Tutorials
  • White Water Rafting

Other Information

Children:

Minimum age to raft is 13 years. Persons over the ages of 13 and under the age of 18 travelling alone or without an adult guardian must have prior consent from a parent in the form of a signed waiver of liability.

Find What's Nearby

Choose a category:
Places to Visit
Displaying 1-10 of 88
Sort by:
Show:

Hope Islands National Park

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
This island national park includes East and West Hope islands as well as Struck Island and Snapper Island. East and West Hope islands are low-lying cays. West Hope Island is a shingle cay formed from piles of loose shingle (coral debris) on which only the most hardy plants such as mangroves survive. East Hope is a typical sand cay, forested with tall coastal trees such as beach almonds. These islands are among the most important bird-nesting sites in the northern Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Thousands of pied imperial-pigeons visit the islands to breed each summer. A delight for birdwatchers and fishers, these tropical islands provide a haven for nature lovers. Relax and enjoy the natural beauty. Bush camp at one of four camp sites on East Hope Island. Watch the birdlife along the shore. Listen to the calls of the pied-imperial pigeons in the trees during summer months. Go snorkelling or diving to discover amazing reef life. Make use of public moorings and throw in a fishing line.

Mount Cook National Park

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
This park features the rugged Mount Cook, which provides a scenic backdrop to the town of Cooktown. Rainforest and tropical woodlands with a heath understorey cover the upper slopes and sheltered gullies. Mount Cook was named after Lieutenant James Cook, navigator and explorer, who had repaired the Endeavour in 1770 where Cooktown now stands, after damaging it on the reefs off Cape Tribulation. Take the steep two kilometre walk to the lookout for scenic views over the Great Barrier Reef and coastline. Climb one kilometre further to Mount Cook's summit. See large granite boulders covered with ferns. Look for tree snakes and lace monitors. Take binoculars for birdwatching.

Misty Mountains Wilderness Walking Tracks

Ravenshoe, Tablelands Area
Free Entry
The Misty Mountains wilderness walking tracks are a 130 kilometre network of short and long wilderness tracks takes visitors through pristine, high altitude rainforest with crystal clear creeks, waterfalls and panoramic views.The tracks cross the Walter Hill Range and the Cardwell Range, extending from the coastal plain to the tablelands. The area forms part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and is recognised for its diversity of rainforest types, plant species and outstanding landscape features. Four long tracks—the Koolmoon Creek, Cannabullen Creek, Cardwell Range and Gorrell tracks—make up the Misty Mountains wilderness walking tracks. Sections of some of the tracks are accessible for shorter walks. Walkers must be well prepeared, self-sufficient and responsible for their own safety. Tell a responsible person where you are going and when you expect to return. A reliable form of communication is essential and satellite phones and PLBs (personal locator beacons) are the most effective.

Mount Whitfield Conservation Park

Cairns, Cairns Area
Free Entry
The rainforest-clad slopes of the Whitfield Range form a dramatic backdrop to Cairns, offering bushwalking opportunities close to the city. Walking tracks through Mount Whitfield Conservation Park climb through shady rainforest gullies and dry open forest and grasslands with cycads to the top of Mount Lumley Hill. Enjoy the short but steep 1.5 kilometre Red Arrow circuit walk through rainforest up to a lookout with views scenic views over the Cairns coastline. Add the more demanding Blue Arrow circuit for a 6.6 kilometre (four to five hour) walk, with an optional 400 metre sidetrack to a lookout at Mount Lumley Hill (325 metres), offering expansive views to the Cairns hinterland and out to Green Island. Picnic at the lookout between your circuit walks. Look for mound-building brush-turkeys, orange-footed scrubfowl and graceful honeyeaters .

Millstream Falls National Park

Ravenshoe, Tablelands Area
Free Entry
Plunging over the edge of a columnar basalt lava flow, Big Millstream Falls is reputedly the widest single-drop waterfall in Australia. Lying in the rain shadow of the eastern dividing ranges, the dry open woodland here is in stark contrast with the rainforest which is only kilometres away. This area is rich in World War II history. Camp sites were constructed for the Battalions of the 7th and 9th Divisions between 1943 and 1945. Picnic in the shady day-use area among the blue gums and ironbarks, or walk down to the viewing area above Millstream Falls. Explore their history as you wander the World War II Heritage track past the camp site remains, where informative signs tell of the conditions at the time and show how the soldiers lived, worked and played. Ride mountain bikes or trail bikes through the park's internal roads and firebreaks. At Little Millstream Falls, view these beautiful falls from just near the car park or enjoy a different perspective by walking the narrow path to the base of the falls.
Free Entry
In this park, an imposing mountain range of massive granite boulders is home to unique wildlife and rich in Aboriginal culture. Located near Cooktown at the northern end of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Black Mountain is imposing mountain range of black granite boulders, some the size of houses, stacked seemingly precariously on one another. The wet tropics and drier savanna woodland regions meet in this park, and an unusual range of wildlife finds refuge here, including species that are found nowhere else. Known as Kalkajaka (meaning 'place of spear'), Black Mountain is an important meeting place for the Eastern Kuku Yalanji Aboriginal people and is the source of many Dreaming stories. Stop at the Black Mountain lookout on the Mulligan Highway on the eastern side of the crest of the Black Mountain boulder field. Signs at the lookout tell of the geology, natural environment, culture and history of the area. There is no other access to the park. Do not risk injury by venturing onto the boulder field. People have been injured and have died trying to climb Black Mountain.
Free Entry
Michaelmas Cay, part of Michaelmas and Upolo Cays National Park, is one of the most important seabird breeding sites in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Michaelmas Cay is a small, low sand cay, covered by grasses and low-growing plants. Upolu Cay is a low, unvegetated sand cay. From the fenced beach access area on Michaelmas Cay, watch seabirds nesting and tending their young without disturbing them. Marvel at the sight of up to 30,000 seabirds occupying the cay at peak nesting periods during summer. Look for sooty terns, common noddies and crested terns. Admire huge flocks of seabirds filling the sky. Go snorkelling to explore the diverse surrounding reefs. Public moorings are provided for private boats.

Clump Mountain National Park

Mission Beach, Cassowary Coast Area
Free Entry
This park, on the scenic coast just north of Mission Beach, contains some of the few remaining patches of undisturbed tropical lowland rainforest in North Queensland. These rainforest remnants are important habitat for the endangered southern cassowary. Bicton Hill is the main feature of the park. The summit of Bicton Hill was historically used as a lookout by Aboriginal people and later as a ship lookout by the area's first permanent European residents. Challenge yourself on the four kilometre Bicton Hill circuit walking track and be rewarded with spectacular mainland and island views, and a chance to see rare rainforest plants and the elusive cassowary. Stay on the track at all times and take care around cliffs, steep slopes and at the lookout.

Snapper Island, Hope Islands National Park

Port Douglas, Douglas Area
Free Entry
This high continental island, close to Port Douglas, boasts lush vine forests, dense eucalypt forest, mangroves and white sandy beaches. The islands and surrounding waters and fringing reefs are within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Snapper Island is within easy reach of the coast by kayak or small boat, and is popular for camping, birdwatching and small boat fishing. Join a guided kayaking trip with a commercial tour operator to paddle around the island and land on seemingly-remote beaches. Explore the short walking track to a rocky ridge to the northern side of the island. Spend the night bush camping and have the island all to yourself. Drop in a line and try your luck fishing for mackerel and other reef fish in this popular angling spot for small boats.

Flinders Group National Park

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
Seven remote and ruggedly attractive islands, with a rich cultural landscape, form Flinders Group National Park. The islands contain important Aboriginal story and burial sites, along with nationally significant rock art showing early contact with Europeans. The islands lie adjacent to Cape Melville and are within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Visit the islands on a commercial cruise vessel or in your private boat. Walk the 2.8 kilometre interpretive trail to learn about the Yiithuwarra 'saltwater people'. Contemplate their rock art in the Ship and Yindayin rock shelters on Stanley Island (Yindayin). Bush camp on Flinders Island (Wurriima). Watch seabirds and look for turtles and dugong. Enjoy the remoteness of this unique park.
No Results Message
Displaying 1-10 of 88
Sort by:
Show:

Explore the REGION

Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).