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Brisbane Cruises

Multiple Locations

Brisbane Cruises is the longest running cruise company on the Brisbane River and operates cruises in both Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Choose from one of our many scheduled cruises including: Brisbane and Gold Coast day cruises, Saint Helena Island penal settlement, Moreton Bay, Brisbane and Bremer Rivers, Bribie Island and special events incorporating the Brisbane to Gladstone Yacht Race, Australia Day, Riverfire, Christmas Day and New Years Eve.

Whatever the occasion, the fabulous crew at Brisbane Cruises have the experience to make your cruise a special celebration.

Treat your guests to a memorable event including weddings, Christmas parties, conferences and high profile events.

Facilities

  • Car park

Activities

  • Animal Viewing
  • Birdwatching
  • Fishing - Beach
  • Guided Walks
  • Lessons/Tutorials
  • Swimming

Other Information

Accessibility:

Access is available for guests with a disability.

Children:

Children are welcome.

Find What's Nearby

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Places to Visit
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Free Entry
Currimundi Lake (Kathleen McArthur) Conservation Park is a natural gem which has survived despite its proximity to Sunshine Coast developments. A pocket of the wallum heath which once covered much of coastal southern Queensland thrives on Lake Currimundi’s northern shore. This type of coastal heathland is rich in plant species, many of which attract birds and insects seeking food and shelter. Wander down the track from Coongarra Esplanade through the park to the beach. After the first 130 metres of wheelchair-accessible track, pause at the lake lookout. Spot the spectacular yellow-spiked flower or knobbly seed pods of the wallum banksia. Walk quietly, looking and listening for wrens, finches and honeyeaters such as the noisy friarbird.
Free Entry
The Boondall Wetlands lie on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. The wetlands include more than 1000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. This track passes through mangroves fringing the shores of Moreton Bay and the banks of Nudgee Creek. Birdlife abounds in the mangroves and a bird hide overlooks the tidal flats at the creek mouth. If you walk at low tide you will notice that these flats are vital feeding grounds for shorebirds. High and low tides in the mangroves reveal two very different worlds.

Mount Ngungun Summit Walking Track

Beerwah, Sunshine Coast Area
Free Entry
Named by Cook during his epic voyage along Australia's east coast, the Glass House Mountains are rhyolitic volcanic plugs left by volcanic activity millions of years ago. This area has special significance for the Gubbi Gubbi Aboriginal people. The Mount Ngungun summit walk begins in open forest with a fern understory. Part way up the mountain there is a great view of Mount Tibrogargan and the track passes a small rock overhang. The summit provides spectacular close-up views of nearby volcanic peaks-Mount Tibrogargan, Mount Coonowrin and Mount Beerwah-and a 360° panoramic view of the coast and hinterland. The 2.8 kilometre track is classed as a grade 4 walking track. Visitors need a moderate level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear. Take plenty of drinking water and wear a hat and sunscreen. Allow about two hours to complete the walk. Caution: Track passes close to cliff edges-supervise children closely. Take extra care around the summit area in wet weather-rocks become very slippery. Walk carefully to avoid dislodging rocks-they might hit walkers or climbers below you.

Boondall Wetlands Reserve

Moreton Bay And Islands, Moreton Bay Area
Free Entry
Boondall Wetlands lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe and includes more than 1,000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, saltmarshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. The Indigenous Australians have lived at Boondall Wetlands for a long time and continue to have links with this land. The Nurri Millen art totems in the wetlands celebrate this culture. Boondall Wetlands has a diversity of wildlife. Mammals that live there include flying foxes, bats, possums and squirrel gliders. There are also a variety of frogs, reptiles and butterflies to be found within the reserve. An amazing variety of birdlife can also be found throughout the diverse vegetation types including mistletoe birds, tawny frogmouths, eastern curlews, kingfishers, rainbow bee-eaters, grass owls and wrens. At low tide, shorebirds feed on the mudflats. Cormorants, darters, egrets, ibis and herons can be seen year round. The Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre offers a range of displays and activities on the environmental and cultural heritage of the reserve for park visitors and organised groups. A track map brochure for Boondall Wetlands Reserve can be obtained from the Brisbane City Council Contact Centre.

Glass House Mountains National Park

Glass House Mountains, Sunshine Coast Area
Free Entry
Craggy volcanic peaks, rhyolite plugs, rise abruptly above the scenic landscape, a rolling green patchwork of pine plantations, bushland and cultivated fields. The Glass House Mountains were named by Lieutenant James Cook as he voyaged up the Queensland coast in 1770. They are spiritually significant to the local Aboriginal people and are listed on the Queensland and National Heritage Registers as a landscape of national significance. In this park, remnants of the open eucalypt woodland and heath vegetation, which once covered the coastal plains, provide a home for an interesting variety of animals and plants. Visit the interpretive centre in the Glass House Mountains township. Drive to the nearby Glass House Mountains lookout in Beerburrum State Forest for views of the multiple peaks. Enjoy a picnic at the base of Mount Beerwah or Mount Tibrogargan. Take the easy Western Boundary walk at Mount Beewah or try a slightly more challenging walk such as the Tibrorgargan circuit or Mount Beeburrum track for great views. If you are a fit, experienced walker with rock climbing skills, tackle the Mount Ngungun summit track. The summit routes on Mounts Ngungun and Tibrogargan are also suitable for roped sports for experienced and well-equipped climbers.

D'Aguilar National Park

The Gap, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
D'Aguilar National Park is a huge, diverse park of scribbly gums and lush rainforest, sprawling over the hills and Mountains at Brisbane's back door. From the parks information centre join in a fun and informative Connect with Nature activity, or explore the wildlife displays at the South East Queensland Wildlife Centre. Enjoy great lookouts, walking tracks and picnic areas, also remote secluded camp sites for experienced walkers and navigators. At Jolly's lookout (wheelchair accessible), cook a barbecue while taking in the views over Samford Valley and listening to early morning birdsong. At Boombana, take a short rainforest walk among strangler figs and climbing vines. In the northern section of the park inspect the remains of the antique sawmill in the Gantry day-use area. Fit walkers can hike the Somerset trail to enjoy views of Somerset and Wivenhoe lakes. The rockpool at Rocky Hole is surrounded by eucalypt forest and is a great place for a cooling swim in summer. Campers can stay at Neurum Creek or the more remote Archer campground (four-wheel-drive access only). This huge park is a treasure trove close to Brisbane, offering a circuit drive of 90 minutes through a range of natural habitats.

Mooloolah River National Park, Jowarra Section

Beerwah, Sunshine Coast Area
Free Entry
This park on the banks of the Mooloolah River, protects one of the few remaining coastal rainforest areas in this region. Also known as Jowarra, this is an important home for wildlife, including the wompoo fruit-dove, eastern yellow robin and the vulnerable Richmond birdwing butterfly. The river is home to platypus, which may be seen at dawn and dusk. Two short, easy walks lead from the rest area: the Mooloolah River circuit and the Melaleuca walk. The tracks are not sealed but in dry weather they are wheelchair accessible. Use insect repellent to deter mosquitoes and leeches.

Fort Lytton National Park

Lytton, Brisbane Area
Fort Lytton National Park protects the birthplace of Queensland's military history. From 1881 to 1945 this classic coastal fortress was the focus of Queensland's defence activity. One of several built around Australia's coast in the nineteenth century for protection from invasion, the well-preserved pentagonal fort is concealed behind grassy embankments and surrounded by a water-filled moat. Join a guided tour and immerse yourself in the fascinating history of the fort and its restored guns, which were designed to fire and disappear! Learn more detail in the museum. Enjoy a picnic with a background of scenic river views. Fort Lytton is half an hour’s drive from the centre of Brisbane.

Bribie Island Recreation Area

Bribie Island, Moreton Bay Area
Free Entry
Bribie Island Recreation Area is a treasure trove of plants and animals. The island is fringed by white, sandy beaches. Heaths and freshwater lagoons support many birds, while the shore provides food and roosting havens for thousands of shorebirds. Dugong thrive in protected waters nearby. Explore the easy Bicentennial bushwalks. Heathland, eucalypt and paperbark forests offer great birdwatching and photography. Go boating or paddle a kayak around Pumicestone Passage. Try your luck at fishing or crabbing. Picnic at Lighthouse Reach or Lions Park. Pitch a tent at Mission Point - or in one of three other camping areas that are accessible only by four wheel drive. Bribie Island is approximately one hour’s driving distance from Brisbane.

Sippy Downs

Sippy Downs, Sunshine Coast Area
Bordered on one side by the beautiful Mooloolah River National Park, and on the other by the Maroochy Bushland Botanic Gardens, Sippy Downs on the Sunshine Coast is best known for the system of picture-postcard lakes that pepper the area. These beautiful, tranquil lakes can be enjoyed from various waterfront parks and picnic areas and can be accessed by numerous walk and bike paths. The National Park on the eastern side of Sippy Downs preserves one of the last remnants of unspoilt coastal lowlands in southern Queensland. The park protects valuable pockets of wallum heath, open eucalypt woodlands and tea-tree swamps. The calm, still waters of the Mooloolah River are perfect for paddling a canoe and in the spring, Mother Nature puts on a show with a spectacular wildflower display. The Botanic Gardens on the western side of Sippy Downs features rock pool, wetlands, fern glades, sculpture gardens and a wonderful array of flora and fauna including the whipbird and fairy wren. Just 10 minutes’ drive west of Sippy Downs is the bustling seaside hot-spot of Mooloolaba. Sippy Downs is three minutes off the Bruce Highway. A range of accommodation options can be found at Mooloolaba including holiday resorts, self-contained units, holiday rentals, and backpacker hostels.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).