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The Italian Restaurant, Cooktown

Cooktown, Cook Area

The Italian Restaurant, Cooktown is noted as being one of the best eating house in the Cape by Trip Advisor.

It has a relaxed, tropical atmosphere with friendly service and authentic Italian recipes. It's a great family restaurant and kids are most welcome. They also have entertainment fortnightly on Saturday nights.

Come and enjoy Pizzas and Pastas, Seafood, Risottos, Steaks and daily specials. They have Vegetarian, dairy free and gluten free options. You'll love their real Italian Pizzas and full a la carte menu. Fully licensed and BYO. Dine in or Takeaway.

Open 4pm till late Tuesday to Saturday nights. Phone or email them to book a table.

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Italian
Modern Italian

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Free Entry
Nature's Powerhouse Visitor Information Centre at the Cooktown Botanic Gardens provides all the information you need to explore this site. Established in 1878 as the Gallop Botanic Reserve, it comprises a formal botanic garden, and a substantial natural forest and ocean frontage. It commemorates the work of naturalists Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander on HMS Endeavour who collected and documented botanical specimens from the district in 1770. A century later Cooktown was the main port for the Palmer River gold fields. Thousands of Chinese landed here, later settling in Cooktown. The Chinese had market gardens here and produced charcoal from timber felled on site. After the declaration of a botanical reserve, a road was built, a nursery established and trees and shrubs ordered from the Acclimatisation Society in Brisbane. During the 1890s, stone lined paths, stone pitched pools and stone-work bridges were built and the nursery supplied ornamental trees for Cooktown. The gardens suffered in the 1907 cyclone, were closed after World War One and were not rebuilt until 1979. The gardens now boast an exotic plant section, a palm garden, a native plants section and 'Solander's Garden' which is used by tourists and locals for recreational and educational purposes.
From AU$10 - 10
The James Cook Historical Museum is housed in the former St Mary's Convent for the Sisters of Mercy, built in 1888-9. Cooktown's economy was buoyant due to the town's role as a port for the region's mineral wealth, dominated by the Palmer River goldmines. The local Catholic Priest was appointed Bishop in 1887, and prioritised the establishment of the convent, day and boarding school for girls. Financed by his Irish relatives, the building was designed by former colonial architect FDG Stanley. As gold production declined so did Cooktown. Businesses that were not prospering didn't rebuild after the destruction of the 1907 cyclone. St Mary's continued to operate until the 1930s. It was occupied by the US military during World War Two and then abandoned and earmarked for demolition. The building was saved and donated to the National Trust for use as the James Cook Historical Museum. The grounds have been landscaped as the Joseph Banks Memorial Garden, planted with species identified by Banks and Dr Solander during their seven week stay at the Endeavour River in 1770. The museum holds many items related to the large Chinese population of Cooktown, including items from a temple formerly located on Charlotte Street.

The Italian Restaurant, Cooktown

Cooktown, Cook Area
The Italian Restaurant, Cooktown is noted as being one of the best eating house in the Cape by Trip Advisor. It has a relaxed, tropical atmosphere with friendly service and authentic Italian recipes. It's a great family restaurant and kids are most welcome. They also have entertainment fortnightly on Saturday nights. Come and enjoy Pizzas and Pastas, Seafood, Risottos, Steaks and daily specials. They have Vegetarian, dairy free and gluten free options. You'll love their real Italian Pizzas and full a la carte menu. Fully licensed and BYO. Dine in or Takeaway. Open 4pm till late Tuesday to Saturday nights. Phone or email them to book a table.

Gone Fishing - Cooktown

Cooktown, Cook Area
From AU$60 - 650
Gone Fishing - Cooktown has been offering fishing and wildlife tours in Cooktown for 12 years and is Cooktown's premier guiding service. Fishing - A host of different habitats are in easy reach from the headwaters of the local rivers chasing sooty grunter and jungle perch, down to the estuaries fishing for the iconic barramundi and mangrove jack; out to the Great Barrier Reef after queenfish, trevally, coral trout and a multitude of other tropical species. Offering half day share charters through to seven day fishing safaris we specialise in small groups of one to five anglers, but happily cater for larger parties. Experienced, beginners and kids are all welcome. Gone Fishing can accommodate wheelchairs and has varied camera work experience. Exclusive charters and locations available on request. Operating year round a huge variety of sensational fishing is on offer including lure-casting, fly fishing and live-baiting. Spend a few hours on a journey from the mouth of the Endeavour River to 10 kilometres upstream amongst the narrow creeks lined with rainforest. Unchanged since Captain Cooks visit in 1770. Learn about this important river system and its relationship with the Great Barrier Reef. Crocodiles aplenty - Birdwatcher and photographers paradise.

Mary Watson Monument Cooktown

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
This monument was erected in 1886 by the residents of Cooktown honouring Mrs Mary Watson. Mary, her infant son and Chinese employee Ah Sam, perished from thirst and exposure after fleeing Lizard Island in October 1881. Ironically the memorial includes a water fountain. Mary Watson's husband Robert had worked a bêche-de-mer processing operation on the island and both lived there after their 1880 marriage. Two Chinese men, Ah Sam and Ah Leong, assisted in the house and garden. Mary gave birth to her son in mid-1881. In September there was a conflict with an Aboriginal group while Robert was away. Ah Leong was killed and Ah Sam wounded. Mary, the baby, and Ah Sam launched a cut-down ship's tank, and left the island on 1 October. They made it to No 5 Howick Island, which unfortunately lacked fresh water. Mary's last diary entry was on 11 October 1881. Returning to find signs of an attack and his wife and child missing, Watson searched in vain. Mary Watson, her son and Ah Sam's remains were found in January 1882. Mary Watson's story saw her raised to heroic status in Queensland's history.

Cooktown War Memorial

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
Recruitment for WWI in the Cooktown region drew men from the tin mining industries around Rossville and Shiptons Flat to the south. After the war, the population of the town was small and early ANZAC commemorations were low key. In 1934 the citizens of Cooktown revived ANZAC Day marking the 16th anniversary of the stand at Villiers Brettoneux. A temporary cenotaph was established at the Cook Memorial. This became the location for future Anzac ceremonies for many years. The Cook Memorial, a tall sandstone column, is located to the north of ANZAC Park, was unveiled in 1888 when Australia was celebrating its centenary. The Cooktown RSL later built a memorial to both WWI and WWII soldiers in a park in the main street, renamed ANZAC Memorial Park. The memorials comprise two granite boulders with metal plaques, the largest of which commemorates all who served in WWI. The smaller listing for WWII service reflects the dwindling of the town in the mid-twentieth century. The second boulder is a general war memorial.

Mount Cook National Park

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
This park features the rugged Mount Cook, which provides a scenic backdrop to the town of Cooktown. Rainforest and tropical woodlands with a heath understorey cover the upper slopes and sheltered gullies. Mount Cook was named after Lieutenant James Cook, navigator and explorer, who had repaired the Endeavour in 1770 where Cooktown now stands, after damaging it on the reefs off Cape Tribulation. Take the steep two kilometre walk to the lookout for scenic views over the Great Barrier Reef and coastline. Climb one kilometre further to Mount Cook's summit. See large granite boulders covered with ferns. Look for tree snakes and lace monitors. Take binoculars for birdwatching.
Free Entry
In this park, an imposing mountain range of massive granite boulders is home to unique wildlife and rich in Aboriginal culture. Located near Cooktown at the northern end of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, Black Mountain is imposing mountain range of black granite boulders, some the size of houses, stacked seemingly precariously on one another. The wet tropics and drier savanna woodland regions meet in this park, and an unusual range of wildlife finds refuge here, including species that are found nowhere else. Known as Kalkajaka (meaning 'place of spear'), Black Mountain is an important meeting place for the Eastern Kuku Yalanji Aboriginal people and is the source of many Dreaming stories. Stop at the Black Mountain lookout on the Mulligan Highway on the eastern side of the crest of the Black Mountain boulder field. Signs at the lookout tell of the geology, natural environment, culture and history of the area. There is no other access to the park. Do not risk injury by venturing onto the boulder field. People have been injured and have died trying to climb Black Mountain.

Lizard Island Group National Park

Lizard Island, Cook Area
Free Entry
Set in a turquoise sea, the six high islands and islets of this park are surrounded by coral reefs, fringed by mangroves and sandy beaches, and cloaked in grasslands, woodlands and wind-sheared heaths. The island group lies midway between the coast and the outer barrier reef, within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. Lizard, the main island, has several idyllic, sheltered, sandy beaches with easy access to picturesque coral and clam gardens. Snorkel in the sheltered, shallow waters of Watsons Bay and discover the famed Clam Gardens. Following in the footsteps of the famous explorer, climb the steep track to Cook's Look for breath-taking views over the islands and reefs. Walk to Blue Lagoon on the other side of the island for secluded swimming and snorkelling. Bush camp near the beach at peaceful Watsons Bay. Learn about a tragic episode in the island's history at Mary Watson's cottage ruin. Look for the yellow-spotted monitor, for which Lizard Island is named, and birdwatch around the island's beaches and walking tracks. Visit the Lizard Island Research Station during their tour times and relax at the resort's Marlin Bar (not open every day).

Cooktown Cemetery

Cooktown, Cook Area
Free Entry
The Cooktown cemetery has been in continuous use since the town was established in October 1873. The cemetery was proclaimed in 1875 with trustees representing each of the denominations in Cooktown; Church of England, Roman Catholic, Presbyterian, Hebrew and Wesleyan Methodist. Despite the large Chinese population there, no Chinese representative was appointed. The entrance gate faces the road to the Palmer River, where gold discoveries led to Cooktown becoming a port. An internal road leads from the gate and forks in the middle of the reserve. The track to the west terminates at a Chinese Shrine with a low concrete altar. Nestled amongst the trees in the north-west of the cemetery is a brick well, evidence of the Chinese market gardeners who once worked there. The rest of the site is divided into denominations by the unsealed paths. Significant graves within the site include that of Mary Watson who died of thirst escaping Lizard Island, 90 kilometres to the north-east; mariner Albert Ross Hovell, son of the explorer William Hovell, known for his involvement in 'blackbirding', or procuring Islanders to work as labourers; and Mother Mary De Sales Meagher, founder of the Sisters of Mercy Convent in Cooktown.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).