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Thrifty Car Rental

Indicative Rate * AU$39 to AU$39

Thrifty is one of the most dynamic vehicle rental companies not only represented in South-East Queensland and Northern New South Wales, but in every State, Territory, major Town and major Airport in Australia. They're 100 per cent Australian owned, so they really know your local area. The modern fleet of vehicles includes an extensive range of cars, trucks, vans, utes and buses and is amongst the youngest in the industry.

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Free Entry
Located just 20 minutes from the Ipswich Central Business District and 35 minutes' from Brisbane Central Business District, White Rock - Spring Mountain Conservation Estate features the distinctive, sculptured, rocky outcrops of White Rock and Spring Mountain. Covering over 2,500ha of regionally significant bushland, the Estate also features extensive forested ridges, escarpments and valleys that are home to an amazing array of plant and wildlife species. Visitors can enjoy the full gamut of outdoor activities including hiking, bird-watching, horse riding (bring your own horses), mountain bike riding and nature study. For the bushwalker there's everything from a leisurely 200 metre walk to the more challenging 19 kilometre round trip trail with most of the trails are suitable for hiking and mountain bike riding. If you're on horseback, then the Yaddamun Trail is perfect. The entry to the Estate is the Paperbark Flats Picnic Area, at the end of School Road in Redbank Plains. Amenities on site include toilets, picnic facilities and horse float parking. Don't forget to take a hat, sunscreen and drinking water. Visit the website for trail updates and to download the trail guide.
Free Entry
The Boondall Wetlands lie on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. The wetlands include more than 1000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. This track passes through mangroves fringing the shores of Moreton Bay and the banks of Nudgee Creek. Birdlife abounds in the mangroves and a bird hide overlooks the tidal flats at the creek mouth. If you walk at low tide you will notice that these flats are vital feeding grounds for shorebirds. High and low tides in the mangroves reveal two very different worlds.

Noosa Heads Coastal Track

Noosa Heads, Noosa Area
Free Entry
Spectacular views can be seen from several lookouts along the track. You will also see coastal rock formations such as the Boiling Pot and Hells Gates. Beaches include Tea Tree Bay, a pandanus-lined sandy beach, the more rocky Granite Bay, historic Winch Cove and the sweeping Alexandria Bay. Koalas frequent the gum trees along this walk and honeyeaters are often seen in the flowering shrubs next to the track. Out to sea, frolicking dolphins and migrating humpback whales are sometimes seen by the keen observer.

Ex-HMAS Brisbane Conservation Park

Mudjimba, Sunshine Coast Area
From AU$15 - 25
Dive the Brisbane and experience this historical treasure and budding environmental wonder. The ex-HMAS Brisbane Conservation Park is an artificial reef and dive site off the Sunshine Coast, and is set to become one of Australia's premier dive attractions. This is the only former Navy dive wreck in Australia offering divers the unique opportunity to explore both the forward engine room and the boiler room. A former missile destroyer, the HMAS Brisbane, was scuttled 2.8 nautical miles east of Mudjimba Island on 31 July 2005 to begin its new life as the 'anchor' attraction for dive tourism in Southern Queensland. Divers can explore the 133 metre former warship and view different areas of the ship. Access holes allow passage into the ship's interior, where divers can swim through living and sleeping quarters used by the crew during the ship’s service from 1967 to 2001.

Denmark Hill Conservation Reserve

Ipswich City, Ipswich Area
Free Entry
It's not often you get an unspoiled natural wonderland in the heart of a city but Denmark Hill Conservation Reserve in Ipswich Central is an idyllic environmental gem. Once you descend the walking tracks amid huge native trees, you completely forget that you're just a few minutes away from the city's main streets. It's a popular place for bird watchers, with owls, kookaburras, wrens, finches and others making their homes there. Just head up to the white water tower on Denmark Hill overlooking the Central Business District and you'll find this hideaway for nature lovers. You can take the five-storey staircase to the top of the tower first for a spectacular vista then have your choice of walking circuits that range from 200 to 800 metres. It's a relaxing walk down to the picnic area where you venture into Triassic Park, complete with a Stegosaurus structure protecting the dinosaur footprints and fossil displays that have been found there. Like many other attractions in Ipswich, Denmark Hill Conservation Reserve has a prolific history. Established as a reserve in the 1880s, it sits above closed-off mine tunnels, with part of the walking trails following the former coal-skip tramway.

Wooroolin Wetland

Wooroolin, South Burnett Area
Free Entry
The Wooroolin Wetland is located at the township of Wooroolin, 16 kilometres north of Kingaroy along the Bunya Highway. Wooroolin Wetlands was declared a fauna sanctuary in 1973, now classified as a palustrine wetland, a non-tidal, inland, seasonally flooded, vegetated swamp. After successive floods in 2011 and 2013, the wetland burst its banks and Wooroolin was flooded for the first time in recorded history. A bird hide and two walking trails have been established for naturalists to fully appreciate resident and migratory fauna. However the walking trails are only accessible during dry periods and can be accessed from Wooroolin Sports Ground. Over 25 different birds have been sighted including nankeen kestrels, striated pardalotes and golden-headed cisticola. Over two kilometers of endangered vegetation has been fenced to help restrict access and protect the local and regional species. Revegetation is taking place in this eucalypt woodland and particular attention is being paid to the endangered Queensland Blue Gum. Wooroolin State School planted 80 native trees in 2003 and will continue with an annual tree-planting program. Nesting boxes have been provided as alternative habitats for sugar gliders and possums. Interpretive signage has been erected to promote project achievements, local information, wildlife and tracks.

Nanango Fauna Reserve

Nanango, South Burnett Area
Free Entry
The Nanango Fauna Reserve offers many different environments of seasonal waterholes, eucalypt woodland, acacia scrub, and dry vine scrub. It is a birdwatcher's delight with a variety of birds to be found including the Yellow-Faced Honeyeater, Australian Darter, Varied Sittella, Nankeen Night Heron, and Little Black and Little Pied Cormorant.

Glass House Mountains National Park

Glass House Mountains, Sunshine Coast Area
Free Entry
They're one of the most quintessential landmarks on the Sunshine Coast - eleven peaks that rise dramatically from the coastal plains. Their beauty caught the attention of Captain James Cook in 1770 who named them the Glass House Mountains because they reminded him of glass furnaces back in Yorkshire. Formed over 26 million years ago, these volcanic plugs are spiritually significant to the local Aboriginal people and are listed on the Queensland and National Heritage Registers as a landscape of national significance. The peaks are known as Mount Beerburrum, Mount Beerwah, Mount Coochin, Mount Coonowrin (Crookneck), Mount Elimbah (The Saddleback), Mount Ngungun, Mount Tibberoowuccum, Mount Tibrogargan, Mount Tunbubudla (The Twins), Wild Horse Mountain (Round Mountain) and Mount Miketeebumulgrai. Remnants of open eucalypt woodland and heath vegetation can be found in the park which is home to a variety of animals and plants. For great views, head to the lookout in Beerburrum State Forest or take on one of the peaks. There are a range of walking trails, ranging in difficulty, that can be found in various locations throughout the National Park. The summit routes on Mounts Ngungun and Tibrogargan are also suitable for roped sports for experienced and well-equipped climbers.

Boondall Wetlands Reserve

Boondall, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
Boondall Wetlands lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe and includes more than 1,000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, saltmarshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. The Indigenous Australians have lived at Boondall Wetlands for a long time and continue to have links with this land. The Nurri Millen art totems in the wetlands celebrate this culture. Boondall Wetlands has a diversity of wildlife. Mammals that live there include flying foxes, bats, possums and squirrel gliders. There are also a variety of frogs, reptiles and butterflies to be found within the reserve. An amazing variety of birdlife can also be found throughout the diverse vegetation types including mistletoe birds, tawny frogmouths, eastern curlews, kingfishers, rainbow bee-eaters, grass owls and wrens. At low tide, shorebirds feed on the mudflats. Cormorants, darters, egrets, ibis and herons can be seen year round. The Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre offers a range of displays and activities on the environmental and cultural heritage of the reserve for park visitors and organised groups. A track map brochure for Boondall Wetlands Reserve can be obtained from the Brisbane City Council Contact Centre.

Ravensbourne National Park

Ravensbourne, Toowoomba Area
Free Entry
For many years, Ravensbourne National Park was a traditional stop over for Aboriginal people on their way to and from bunya festivals in the Bunya Mountains. Today, visitors come to admire rainforest remnants, majestic Sydney blue gums and more than 80 bird species, including green catbirds and vulnerable black-breasted button-quail. Under the rainforest's dense canopy, orchids and elkhorns thrive. Picnic at either Blackbean or Cedar Block day-use area and explore the park's five short tracks (the longest is two hours). Near Cedar Block's self-guiding walk, Gus Beutel lookout gives panoramic views of the Lockyer Valley and Scenic Rim. On other tracks, watch for red-tailed black-cockatoos in the she-oaks and listen for the ringing calls of paradise riflebirds. Lorikeets and fairy-wrens are also often seen. Bring wood to enjoy a barbecue at either picnic area. There is no camping on-site. Stay at nearby Crows Nest National Park, at Cressbrook Dam or in nearby towns.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).