0

Low Isles

Situated 15 kilometres north-east of Port Douglas, the Low Isles comprise a four acre coral cay surrounded by 55 acres of reef. The reefs are very close to the island, which makes snorkelling an easy and enjoyable experience. The two small islands are separate but share the common reef.

The larger of the two, Woody Island, is uninhabited except for a large bird population. It is a vital habitat for many species.

The smaller of the Low Isles is a coral cay with a lighthouse that has been operating since 1878. Weather data has been gathered from the island since 1887, and scientific associations date back to 1928 when it was the base for a year-long scientific survey that examined the structure and ecology of the surrounding reef. This was the first scientific study of a coral reef anywhere in the world, and many current theories of coral reef ecology are based on the findings of this expedition.

There are 150 different species of hard corals in the waters surrounding Low Isles, although these are dominated by 15 species of soft corals. If you look closely, the feathery tentacles of soft corals can often be seen collecting tiny food particles from the water around them. Living amongst the corals is a large variety of fish, molluscs, sea cucumbers and other animals. Colourful blue, green and purple parrotfish are a common sight as well as angelfish, damselfish, anenomefish or clownfish, trevally, rabbitfish, sweetlip, moon wrasse and fusilleers, just to name a few! Plus, you might run into the resident turtles.

The lightstation (controlled by Queensland Parks and Wildlife) on the flat low lying western island, was completed and exhibited in 1878. The 18 metre tower was originally constructed on a timber frame with a galvanised sheath in the typical Queensland fashion, however Low Isles was the first to have porthole windows.

Find What's Nearby

Choose a category:
Places to Visit
Displaying 1-10 of 25
Sort by:
Show:
Free Entry
The Boondall Wetlands lie on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. The wetlands include more than 1000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca, grasslands, open forests and woodlands.

Millstream Falls National Park

Ravenshoe, Tablelands Area
Free Entry
Plunging over the edge of a columnar basalt lava flow, Big Millstream Falls is reputedly the widest single-drop waterfall in Australia. Lying in the rain shadow of the eastern dividing ranges, the dry open woodland here is in stark contrast with the rainforest which is only kilometres away.

Boondall Wetlands Reserve

Boondall, Brisbane Area
Free Entry
Boondall Wetlands lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe and includes more than 1,000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, saltmarshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands.

Clump Mountain National Park

Mission Beach, Cassowary Coast Area
Free Entry
This park, on the scenic coast just north of Mission Beach, contains some of the few remaining patches of undisturbed tropical lowland rainforest in North Queensland. These rainforest remnants are important habitat for the endangered southern cassowary.

Djiru National Park

Mission Beach, Cassowary Coast Area
Free Entry
This park protects some of the last remaining lowland rainforest in the wet tropics, including a rare patch of licuala fan palm forest and is one of the few places you're likely to see an unusual and endangered bird, the southern cassowary.

Tully Gorge National Park

Tully, Cassowary Coast Area
Free Entry
In this park, the Tully River plunges down the Cardwell Range, through the densely forested Tully Gorge, in Australia's wettest area, part of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Heavy rainfall encourages lush tropical vegetation and ensures plenty of white-water on the Tully River.

Mamu Tropical Skywalk

Innisfail, Cassowary Coast Area
From AU$19 - 23
The Mamu Rainforest Canopy Walkway is a spectacular walk through the canopy of World Heritage rainforest. It is an iconic tourist attraction in the heart of the Wet Tropics. With a 350 metre long elevated walkway through the canopy, a cantilever, a 37 metre observation tower and more than 1200 metres of walking tracks, this attraction is a must do for anyone visiting the region.

Conway National Park

Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Conway National Park is a peaceful coastal park with rainforest-clad hills, secluded beaches and panoramic outlooks over the scenic Whitsunday area. This park includes the rainforest-clad Conway Peninsula and protects the largest area of lowland tropical rainforest in Queensland outside Tropical North Queensland.

Licuala State Forest

Mission Beach, Cassowary Coast Area
Free Entry
Licuala State Forest boasts several enjoyable walking tracks. Enjoy the native wildlife of the area as you walk around the forest…the Ulysses butterfly, cassowaries and green tree frogs. Be sure to look upwards to enjoy the sunlight shining through the beautiful palm leaves…it's truly remarkable!

Wild Horse Mountain Lookout

Caboolture, Moreton Bay Area
Free Entry
Wild Horse Mountain Lookout stands out against the skyline as one drives north. The turnoff is located 30 kilometres north of Brisbane just off the Bruce Highway near Caboolture . Named after the wild brumbies which roamed the area, Wild horse Mountain stands 123 metres above sea level.
No Results Message
Displaying 1-10 of 25
Sort by:
Show:

Explore the Region

Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).