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Fraser Island

Visit Fraser Island to be dwarfed by ancient rainforests growing out of only sand and to explore the freshwater lakes and spectacular sand formations of one of the most incredible islands on earth.

World Heritage-listed Fraser Island has the absolute best that one island can offer - cool towering rainforests to walk through; over 100 freshwater lakes to swim including the iconic Lake McKenzie, huge sand blows to climb, and an amazing 120 kilometre beach highway, complete with the Maheno shipwreck and cliffs of stunning coloured sands.

Lying off the coast of Hervey Bay and just south of the last of the Great Barrier Reef's coral cays, Fraser is the world's largest sand island and stretches for 123 kilometres.

Unforgettable island eco-adventures include cruises to discover the untouched beauty of the remote western side and guided or self-drive tours.

Though surrounded by untamed wilderness and rugged terrain, Fraser Island boasts luxurious, relaxing and natural accommodation experiences.

Fraser Island also offers some of the best beach fishing experiences in the world, and provides options for young novice anglers and seasoned fishing professionals.

Whatever adventure you are looking for, Fraser Island has you covered.

Fraser Island
Fraser Island, Fraser Coast Area
Queensland
Australia

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Art Gallery, The

Injune, Maranoa Area
Free Entry
Be ready to be awed by what awaits you on this walk in Carnarvon Gorge National Park, as The Art Gallery contains some of the finest Aboriginal rock art in Australia. Just 5.6 kilometres from the trailhead, at the junction of Kamoloo Creek, a signposted access track leaves the main walking trail upstream of crossing number 10, providing a gentle climb to the escarpment base where the site is located. Boardwalks, interpretive signs and seating facilities provide optimum conditions for visitors to appreciate this diverse range of Aboriginal artwork without endangering it. This extensive gallery contains more than 600 stencils and 1300 engravings. Aboriginal rock art on the sandstone overhangs is a fragile reminder of the Aboriginal people who used the gorge for thousands of years for ceremonies and rituals.

Minerva Hills National Park

Springsure, Central Highlands Area
Free Entry
A relatively small National Park near Springsure in Central Queensland, Minerva Hills is dominated by Mount Boorambool, rising 600 metres above sea level, and the larger cliff fringed Mount Zamia (560 metres), which offer panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. Named after the Minerva Hills Volcanics, these mountains are some of the oldest in a line of volcanoes across the eastern Australian continent - dating back some 20 million years. The rich variety of plants provide habitat for much wildlife. Look for eastern grey kangaroos, wallaroos and several different wallabies throughout the park. Spotlighting at night may reward with a sighting of the elusive sugar-glider or the larger greater-glider. The park is also home to the locally rare fawn-footed melomies and the little known pebble-mound mouse. Fred Gorge picnic area has wood barbecues, toilets, limited drinking water and shelter sheds. Picnic tables are provided at the Springsure and Eclipse lookouts. Camping is not permitted.

Mount Fox

Ingham, Hinchinbrook Area
Free Entry
Located south-west of Ingham, Mount Fox was created by a violent volcanic explosion about 100000 years ago. In the explosion, a lava flow 10 metres thick spewed from the southern end of the crater and chunks of molten magma were thrown out of the volcano's vent. Today, the well formed crater, about 10 metres deep, is covered with sparse grasses and stunted trees amongst the eucalypt woodland environment. The pink and long-fruited bloodwoods are common in this area and vine thicket is found in a steep gully on the southern slopes. Mount Fox's tussock grass slopes shelter a number of small animals. On a cool day in the winter months, skinks and other reptiles can be seen basking on the volcanic bombs. During the hot summer months, the grasses provide protection from the sun and are ideal nesting places for ground-dwelling birds like the little button quail. After sunset, rufous bettongs (small wallaby-type mammals) emerge to feed on herbs and grasses. The large wing span of a wedge-tailed eagle can also be seen, as this bird of prey soars above the Mount Fox crater.

Heart Reef

Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Heart Reef, in the Great Barrier Reef of the Whitsundays, is a stunning composition of coral that has naturally formed into the shape of a heart. Located in Hardy Reef, Heart Reef is best experienced from the air by helicopter or seaplane, as visitors are unable to snorkel or dive there due it's protected status. Many tour companies will combine a scenic flight over Heart Reef with other breathtaking spots in the Whitsundays, including Whitehaven Beach and Hill Inlet. A certain highlight of any visit to the Whitsundays. Heart Reef was discovered in 1975 by one of Air Whitsunday's pilots and is now an internationally-recognised attraction of the Whitsundays and features on many postcards and brochures promoting the Whitsunday region and the Great Barrier Reef. Many an amateur photographer has been amazed by the fact that their own photos look just like the brochures! Heart Reef has been the site of many proposals and declarations of love over the years. If planning on making the ultimate romantic gesture, let your pilot know your plans and they'll be able to help you with some extra flight time over the famous icon.

Ex-HMAS Brisbane Conservation Park

Mudjimba, Sunshine Coast Area
From AU$15 - 25
Dive the Brisbane and experience this historical treasure and budding environmental wonder. The ex-HMAS Brisbane Conservation Park is an artificial reef and dive site off the Sunshine Coast, and is set to become one of Australia's premier dive attractions. This is the only former Navy dive wreck in Australia offering divers the unique opportunity to explore both the forward engine room and the boiler room. A former missile destroyer, the HMAS Brisbane, was scuttled 2.8 nautical miles east of Mudjimba Island on 31 July 2005 to begin its new life as the 'anchor' attraction for dive tourism in Southern Queensland. Divers can explore the 133 metre former warship and view different areas of the ship. Access holes allow passage into the ship's interior, where divers can swim through living and sleeping quarters used by the crew during the ship’s service from 1967 to 2001.

Birdwatching on Keswick Island

Keswick Island, Mackay Area
Free Entry
Keswick Island is a bird watcher's paradise. The island is home to many different bird species, with sightings of at least 33 different birds documented to date - an impressive variety for an island of Keswick's size. The ground dwellers are easy to spot, often crossing the road up ahead or making their way along the grassy verges as you drive along in your buggy. Curlews and Lapwings will lay eggs just about anywhere, not even bothering to build the most rudimentary nest. Spectacular Sea Eagles and Kites can be regularly seen on Keswick. They build large nests, usually on cliff tops, and are known to re-use the same nest year after year. Notable nests on Keswick have been seen at Langton Point and near Singapore Bay. Eagles' nests are best viewed from a boat. To find out more about which bird species are able to be seen on Keswick Island, visit their website.

Pinnacles, The

Hook Island, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Arguably the best dive site in the Whitsundays, with hard corals comparing favourably to those seen on the outer Great Barrier Reef. The best dive is off the western beach, adjacent to the Woodpile and swim east at a depth of seven to 15 metres. Large coral bommies dominate the terrain, reaching nearly to the surface. Acropora corals are everywhere and huge porite corals in the shape of boulders and massive towers can also be seen. Manta rays are very common in the cooler months, May to September, as are big Maori Wrasse. This dive is not for the faint-hearted as black and white tip reef sharks are frequently seen! In the shallow water, particularly off the western beach, the coral cover is nearly solid, mostly staghorn, with only a few sandy patches. Excellent snorkelling just off the western beach too. Diving depth is three to 18 metres. Diving visibility is typically three to 15 metres.

Tree Top Walkway

Canungra, Scenic Rim Area
Free Entry
O'Reilly's Tree Top Walk allows you to walk through a canopy of flowering and fruiting trees covered by vines whilst you explore the epiphytic orchids and ferns surrounded by the many birds and animals that inhabit the tree tops. The Tree Top Walk, was the first of its kind in Australia, is 180 metres in length and is made up of nine suspension bridges, with much of the walkway being 15 metres above the ground. Profiles depicting the rainforest flora close by have been placed along the walkway to assist visitors in identifying the plants in the immediate vicinity. Two observation decks have been constructed in a Strangler Fig above the walk way, the highest one being 30 metres (approximately 110 feet) above the ground. The Tree Top Walk is a unique and innovative structure that gives visitors what can only be described as an exhilarating experience - a chance to observe life in the rainforest canopy at close range for the first time in their lives. Free of charge and there is no age or height restrictions for this activity. However, parental guidance of young children during the climbing aspect of the activity is recommended.
Free Entry
The Boondall Wetlands lie on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. The wetlands include more than 1000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. This track passes through mangroves fringing the shores of Moreton Bay and the banks of Nudgee Creek. Birdlife abounds in the mangroves and a bird hide overlooks the tidal flats at the creek mouth. If you walk at low tide you will notice that these flats are vital feeding grounds for shorebirds. High and low tides in the mangroves reveal two very different worlds.

Mount Scoria Conservation Park

Thangool, Banana Area
Free Entry
Rising 150 metres above cultivated plains, Mount Scoria is a striking landmark near Biloela in the Banana Shire. Formed by volcanic activity 20 to 26 million years ago, this volcanic plug features many-sided basalt columns. Known as the 'Musical Mountain', Mount Scoria is one of only three prehistoric rock formations in the world which were originally the core of a volcano. When the basalt columns are struck (carefully) by another rock, musical notes ring out over the plain. Hence the term, Musical Mountain. Take the short cultural track to view the mountain and learn about its significance to the Gangulu people. Have a picnic, go birdwatching or barbecue at the picnic area.
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