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Double Island

Traditionally Double Island has only been available for exclusive 'private whole of island' use, however they are now delighted to announce that Double Island is now available for individual couples, family and friends to enjoy on a three night minimum basis for specially selected holiday periods during the year.

Double Island offers the opportunity of experiencing your very own private island family getaway, without the isolation that is so often associated with island life. Palm Cove jetty is a short 10 minute boat ride away and the daily launch service will connect you to all day tours to Cairns, the Daintree National Park, Cape Tribulation and all the excitement of the Great Barrier Reef. In addition; being on the doorstep of Palm Cove enables guests to also access some of the best dining experiences the region has to offer.

The island apartments are self contained, and guests staying with them can arrange for their apartments to be stocked prior to arrival, or alternatively following their arrival they can access a wide choice of shops and food outlets at nearby Palm Cove village, by taking advantage of their boat transfer service.

Double Island, Cairns Area
Queensland
Australia

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Whale Watching on Keswick Island

Keswick Island, Mackay Area
Free Entry
Humpback Whales can be frequently seen around Keswick Island during their annual migration through the Whitsundays between the months of July to September. Seeing the whales frolicking nearby, or guiding a newborn calf through the protected waters of Egremont Passage, is a truly magical experience. There are many spots on Keswick from which you can watch the whales - be it from the deck of the Keswick Kiosk, from Basil Bay beach or from any of the prominent headlands. If you are watching whales from your boat, be sure to comply with the Australian National Guidelines for Whale and Dolphin Watching.

Bees on Keswick Island

Keswick Island, Mackay Area
Free Entry
Keswick Island is home to thriving hives of purebred Caucasian bees. Unlike bees on the Australian mainland, these bees are free of many other diseases and are sometimes used as breeding stock for the mainland colonies. The bees were brought to the island in 1986. The bees are supported by aparists, John and Des Covey and Keswick Developments encourages this operation as a means of preserving a valuable part of the natural ecosystem. The Bee Hives can be found on the walking trails towards Langton Point and Connie Bay. Keswick Island honey is available to purchase at the Keswick Island Kiosk, the Mackay Visitor Information Centre and at other stores stocking local produce around the Mackay Region.

Whitehaven Beach

Whitsundays, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Whitehaven Beach is a pristine, award winning beach on Whitsunday Island, the largest of the 74 islands in the Whitsundays. Whitehaven Beach stretches over seven kilometres and boasts brilliant white silica sand that is among the purest in the world. Sink your feet into the sand and wade into the warm waves that gently lap the shore and you'll soon realise why people come here from all over the world. At the northern end of Whitehaven Beach is Hill Inlet, a stunning inlet where the tide shifts the sand and water to create a beautiful fusion of colours. Many people claim Hill Inlet and Whitehaven Beach are the most beautiful places they've ever seen. The lookout at Tongue Point is the best spot from which to view the swirling sands of Hill Inlet, so if you don't mind a short bushwalk, book your Whitehaven tour with an operator that visits the lookout. Whitehaven Beach can be experienced in several ways. If you're interested in a day trip there are ferries, yachts, power boats and luxury cruising yachts that depart from Airlie Beach. A variety of sailing companies also offer multi-day charters that include a memorable visit to Whitehaven Beach.

Heart Reef

Airlie Beach, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Heart Reef, in the Great Barrier Reef of the Whitsundays, is a stunning composition of coral that has naturally formed into the shape of a heart. Located in Hardy Reef, Heart Reef is best experienced from the air by helicopter or seaplane, as visitors are unable to snorkel or dive there due it's protected status. Many tour companies will combine a scenic flight over Heart Reef with other breathtaking spots in the Whitsundays, including Whitehaven Beach and Hill Inlet. A certain highlight of any visit to the Whitsundays. Heart Reef was discovered in 1975 by one of Air Whitsunday's pilots and is now an internationally-recognised attraction of the Whitsundays and features on many postcards and brochures promoting the Whitsunday region and the Great Barrier Reef. Many an amateur photographer has been amazed by the fact that their own photos look just like the brochures! Heart Reef has been the site of many proposals and declarations of love over the years. If planning on making the ultimate romantic gesture, let your pilot know your plans and they'll be able to help you with some extra flight time over the famous icon.

Birdwatching on Keswick Island

Keswick Island, Mackay Area
Free Entry
Keswick Island is a bird watcher's paradise. The island is home to many different bird species, with sightings of at least 33 different birds documented to date - an impressive variety for an island of Keswick's size. The ground dwellers are easy to spot, often crossing the road up ahead or making their way along the grassy verges as you drive along in your buggy. Curlews and Lapwings will lay eggs just about anywhere, not even bothering to build the most rudimentary nest. Spectacular Sea Eagles and Kites can be regularly seen on Keswick. They build large nests, usually on cliff tops, and are known to re-use the same nest year after year. Notable nests on Keswick have been seen at Langton Point and near Singapore Bay. Eagles' nests are best viewed from a boat. To find out more about which bird species are able to be seen on Keswick Island, visit their website.

Wallabies on the Beach at Cape Hillsborough

Cape Hillsborough, Mackay Area
Free Entry
Cape Hillsborough National Park, approximately 45 minutes north of Mackay, is where you'll find rainforest meets the shoreline, volcanic headlands, eucalypt forests home to koalas and kookaburras and prehistoric rock formations. Cape Hillsborough Beach, also know as Casuarina Beach, provides one of the most iconic Australian photo backdrops, the 'Roo on the beach' at sunrise. Wallabies and kangaroos scour the morning tide for mangrove seed pods, seaweed and coral sand dollars. Enjoy the sunrise as wild marsupials bound up and down the beach. Remember however, that these are wild animals and should be treated as such. Please do not feed the kangaroos and wallabies and ensure to keep a safe distance at all times.

Pinnacles, The

Hook Island, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Arguably the best dive site in the Whitsundays, with hard corals comparing favourably to those seen on the outer Great Barrier Reef. The best dive is off the western beach, adjacent to the Woodpile and swim east at a depth of seven to 15 metres. Large coral bommies dominate the terrain, reaching nearly to the surface. Acropora corals are everywhere and huge porite corals in the shape of boulders and massive towers can also be seen. Manta rays are very common in the cooler months, May to September, as are big Maori Wrasse. This dive is not for the faint-hearted as black and white tip reef sharks are frequently seen! In the shallow water, particularly off the western beach, the coral cover is nearly solid, mostly staghorn, with only a few sandy patches. Excellent snorkelling just off the western beach too. Diving depth is three to 18 metres. Diving visibility is typically three to 15 metres.

Bushwalking on Keswick Island

Keswick Island, Mackay Area
Free Entry
Bushwalking on Keswick Island is a great way to marvel at the natural treasures that change with the seasons. You can wind through tropical vegetation, climb hills that reward you with spectacular views, or stroll along sandy beaches and fringing reef at low tide. Notable walks include trails to the spectacular Langton Point lookout and to Connie Bay/Sarah Point lookouts - these walks pass the hives of the fascinating honey bees. At the other end of the island, the Coral Gardens Lookout is a nice spot to walk to for a picnic lunch, with majestic grass trees and vast views across to St Bees and beyond. And the rainforest walk to Arthur Bay is often a magical walk through swarms of vibrant blue butterflies.

Butterfly Bay - Hook Island

Hook Island, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
A popular bareboat anchorage, Butterfly Bay is situated on the northern side of Hook Island. There are limited public moorings and snorkelling can be enjoyed along the bay edge or just off the beach. Offering coral outcrops with shallow walls, the bay is populated by many small, colourful reef fish species. The best of the bommies is found in the centre of the bay, although it may be difficult to locate at high tide. Be wary of tidal currents when moving towards the centre of the bay, away from the edges. Visibility: 2 - 10 metres. Diving depth: 5 - 12 metres. Bottom: coral cover with large patches of coral rubble and silty sand.

Blue Pearl Bay

Hayman Island, Whitsunday Area
Free Entry
Blue Pearl Bay is located on the north-western side of Hayman Island in the Whitsundays Group. Popular with tourists and locals for snorkelling, diving and sightseeing, Blue Pearl Bay is known for its coral and fish life including a resident Maori Wrasse. Day tours and overnight boats visit Blue Pearl Bay for snorkelling and or scuba diving. Visitors typically swim directly off their vessel, or tender into the southern beach and enter the water from the coral beach. Diving depth is from three to 18 metres. Diving visibility is typically from three to 15 metres. Best coral cover to be seen in shallow water off the southern beach. Scattered bommies with silty sand bottom at five to 18 metres, dropping off to coral rubble and silty sand below 18 metres. Best dive off southern beach, near Castle Rock. Shallow coral ledge (two to three metres) dropping off as descent wall to 10 to 15 metres. Wall has narrow canyons and caves making for great exploration. Strong corals near Castle Rock have some striking gorgonian fans at eight to 15 metres as well as whip corals. The shallow waters are predominately staghorn coral. Good protection from all winds except north-westerlies.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).