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Boonooroo

Boonooroo and neighbouring Tuan on Queensland's Fraser Coast are not your typical sleepy fishing hamlet - they also boast spectacular views across the Great Sandy Strait to Fraser Island, the world's largest sand island.

With a caravan park, bowls club, golf course, tennis court, and bike and boat hire, Boonooroo is the perfect place for a holiday filled with great fishing and relaxation.

Boonooroo is one of a handful of charming seaside hamlets doted along the spectacular shoreline of the Great Sandy Strait - a cluster of small islands and sand bars in the waterway between the Fraser Island, and the Fraser Coast mainland.

Follow the Great Sandy Strait Discovery Drive to experience these coastal villages, surrounding national parks, coloured sands and sand blows, incredible birdlife, fishing and boating.

From Boonooroo sail, canoe or cruise the strait's protected waterways which rival the beauty and diversity of the Whitsunday Passage.

At nearby Poona National Park discover wallum heath and a unique collection of Australian flora and fauna including tea trees, kangaroos, eucalypts, galahs, bottle brush and sea eagles.

The area is also the second largest protection area in Queensland for the dugong.

Boonooroo, Great Sandy Strait
Queensland
Australia

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Coongarra Rock

Biggenden, North Burnett Area
Free Entry
For Four Wheel Drive enthusiasts, Coongarra Rock and Falls provide an opportunity to explore rocky outcrops, caves, rock pools and natural vegetation. It is possible to climb the rock but should only be attempted by fit and experienced bushwalkers. It is situated 24 kilometres south of Biggenden and Coalstoun Lakes. Lords Road is the turn off to Coongarra Rock. The road goes to within a short distance of this spectacular outcrop in a dry scrubby State Forest. The road to the falls branches off the road to Coongarra Rock and goes within walking distance of the top of the falls. The roads should only be attempted by Four Wheel Drive vehicles. These roads can be dangerous after heavy rain and care should be taken at all times.

Mount Walsh National Park

Biggenden, North Burnett Area
A prominent landmark in the Biggenden region is the granite bluff area of Mount Walsh, in the northern part of mountainous Mount Walsh National Park. Exposed granite outcrops, rugged ridges and steep forested slopes support a range of vegetation. Follow the 300 metre trail from the picnic area through open eucalypt forest to a rocky creek gully fringed in rainforest, then on to lookouts over surrounding countryside. With caution, experienced walkers can take the strenuous (unmarked) two and a half hour hike to Mount Walsh's bare granite summit. You will be rewarded with stunning views.

Mudlo National Park

Kilkivan, Gympie Area
Mudlo National Park, known locally as Mudlo Gap, protects one of the area’s few remaining stands of native hoop pine rainforest. Tall hoop pines once covered much of the coastal ranges. The park is near the site of Queensland's first gold discovery - at Kilkivan township in 1852. Go for the short, scenic drive to Mudlo Gap for excellent views. The Mudlo Gap track is steep with many steps, but the view from the lookout is impressive. Enjoy a picnic beside Scrubby Creek. Part of the one kilometre Scrubby Creek walking track is wheel chair accessible - through dry rainforest, past giant figs and pleasant creeks. On your walks, keep your eyes open for whiptail wallabies and listen for wonga pigeons.

Port of Maryborough

Maryborough, Fraser Coast Area
Free Entry
The marina also known as the Port of Maryborough is home to the last remnants of originals wharfs and is a must see for those visiting. A deeper site was selected to replace the first shallow port of Maryborough which was located upriver at the original township. Wool, tallow, hides and timber were exported through the busy port and many coastal vessels brought supplies for the settlers. At one time the wharves stretched from the far end of Queens Park to beyond the Granville Bridge. Between 1859 when Maryborough was declared an official Port of Entry and 1901, more than 22000 immigrants from Great Britain and Europe entered Australia through the port. Ships also brought Kanaka labour from the South Sea Islands to work on local sugar plantations. Ship building and repair industries added to the liveliness of the port. The derelict sheds behind the marina are remnants from the site of the Walker Shipyards which closed in 1974.

Mary River

Maryborough, Fraser Coast Area
Free Entry
The Mary River has been known by many names, with the Aborigines calling the river Booie, Moonaboola, Numabulla or Mooraboocoola. It was named the Wide Bay River until September 1848, when Governor Fitzroy renamed the river in honour of his wife, Lady Mary Fitzroy. The Mary River is unique in that it flows from south to north with its headwaters near the Sunshine Coast hinterland and its mouth at River Heads just south of Hervey Bay. Maryborough is also home to the stunning Mary River Parklands which is built on the site of the original Port of Maryborough and forms part of the Portside Precinct. Parkland surrounding the river offers natural terracing, community forecourt, public art works, winding pathways and gardens.

Queens Park Waterfall

Maryborough, Fraser Coast Area
Free Entry
Enjoy the popular spot for picnics, the Queens Park Waterfall. The waterfall area of Maryborough's Queens Park was originally a quarry, which was later converted into a pond, that is regularly home to several ducks swimming on its surface or even catching some sun on the edges. The waterfall feature was constructed in the 1970s. It is also frequently used as a backdrop for weddings.

Brooyar State Forest

Gympie, Gympie Area
Free Entry
Brooyar State Forest features sandstone cliffs, hoop pine plantations and a mix of tall open eucalypt forest with spotted gums. Pockets of riparian rainforest fringe Glastonbury Creek. Take a scenic drive, stopping to enjoy views from Point Pure lookout (300 metre return walk) or a short stroll along an old logging road through rainforest. You can picnic at Glastonbury Creek, or set up your tent or caravan on the grassy camping area nearby. Relax and absorb the tranquillity. In summer, feast your eyes on the forest's colours: rich red and yellow flowers of black bean trees, and vivid orange flower spikes of silky oaks. You can camp with your dog overnight, but must keep it on a leash.

Howard

Burrum Coast, Fraser Coast Area
Nestled in the hinterland of Hervey Bay is the lovely historical village of Howard. Serviced twice daily by the 'Tilt Train,' Howard is an easy 15 minute drive to Maryborough, 25 minutes to Hervey Bay and 20 minutes to the beaches of Toogoom and Burrum Heads. Howard has several buildings of historical significance including a beautifully restored Queenslander offering guided tours and Devonshire Teas. Howard's small museum tells of the coal mining and farming history of the area and includes war memorabilia. Country markets are held in Steeley Street on the first Saturday of every month and there are a range of great swimming and fishing spots to enjoy on the nearby Burrum River.

Maaroom

Great Sandy Strait, Fraser Coast Area
The tiny inlet of Maaroom in Queensland's Fraser Coast region is nestled along the spectacular shoreline of the Great Sandy Strait - with stunning views across to the world's largest sand island, Fraser Island. This tranquil seaside hideaway, just twenty kilometres south of Maryborough along the Cooloola Coast Road, has a caravan park and an all-weather boat ramp with tidal access for fishing. Down at the water's edge is a pleasant spot to have a picnic with sheltered gazebo and playground. Maaroom is part of a collection of quaint fishing villages dotted along the water's edge of the Great Sandy Strait - the waterway between Fraser Island and the Fraser Coast Mainland. Let the pace wind back several notches by following the Great Sandy Strait Discovery Drive to these villages and surrounding national parks to discover coloured sands and sand blows, incredible birdlife, fishing and boating.

Kilkivan

Kilkivan, Gympie Area
Kilkivan is the north-eastern entrance to the South Burnett and is home to a host of experiences. Tempt your tastebuds with local olives and redclaw crayfish. Tantalise your senses with the aroma and healing properties of lavender direct from the farm. Allow yourself to glimpse life as it used to be, by wandering the town's historical museum in the main street. Queensland's first gold discovery was at Kilkivan in 1852 and subsequent findings escalated into a gold rush in 1868. Small pockets of gold are still found to this day and visitors can have a go at gold panning. Brochures describing short walks and drives to places of interest are available. Check out Mudlo Gap Conservation Park, north of Kilkivan especially if you have an interest in bird watching. Have a cold drink at the hotel and meet some of the locals. As well as lovely accommodation, the local B&B offers sumptuous meals and the opportunity to take some of the goodies with you in a South Burnett gift hamper. Annually, the town hosts 'The Kilkivan Great Horse Ride', an exciting event which has been known to attract over 1000 riders to its trek along parts of the Bicentennial National Trail.
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