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Tin Can Bay

Secluded in the midst of picturesque Tin Can Inlet, experience a tranquil getaway to this area known for its eco-tourism surroundings. Tin Can Bay is a perfect place to unwind and relax. Originally known by the aborigines as Tuncanbar, this peaceful bayside town is well known for its recreational fishing and boating pleasures. There's an excellent public boat ramp. Indeed, fishing is the major industry here, with prawning fleets based in Schnapper Creek.

There's a range of accommodation options in the township, from caravan park to holiday units.

Tin Can bay is about 210 kilometres north of Brisbane.

Tin Can Bay, Gympie Area
Queensland
Australia

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Tin Can Bay Wildflower Walk

Tin Can Bay, Gympie Area
Free Entry
Tin Can Bay is blessed with a unique collection of spectacular wildflower species. Many natural areas throughout the Bay come alive with brilliant colour in the Spring months, although wildflowers can be seen year round. Their indigenous wildflowers, like other local native flora species, have adapted to living in soils largely deficient in nutrients. Take a close look at their wonderful wildflowers in their natural environment.

Wolf Rock Dive Site

Rainbow Beach, Gympie Area
Free Entry
Wolf Rock consists of five interconnecting granite pinnacles rising from 40 metres aligned on a north-south axis. The southern pinnacle reaches 19 metres, the next two break the surface, the northern pinnacles are at 11 and 16 metres. The terrain varies; the eastern sheer walls drop to 35 metres; the western side has a wide gutter at 25 metres plus. Black coral trees, spiky soft corals, hard corals, gorgonians and spiral sea whips. Grey nurse sharks, spotted eagle rays, turtles, Queensland gropers, schools of batfish, trevally and surgeonfish, as well as sweetlips, bream, angelfish, goatfish, globefish and fairy basslets. In the shallows look for the smaller critters including moray eels, nudibranchs, gobies, scorpionfish, sea stars, shrimps and coral crabs.

Inskip Peninsula Recreation Area

Rainbow Beach, Gympie Area
Free Entry
The Inskip Peninsula Recreation Area separates open ocean surf from the sheltered estuary waters of Tin Can Bay and the Great Sandy Strait. This is a wetland of international importance. The sand spit is clad in casuarina, cypress pine and other coastal vegetation, providing a great habitat for birds. The beaches and mudflats are roosts for waders and thousands of resident and migratory shorebirds. Bring your own drinking water and camp in one of four shady camping areas. Enjoy wide ocean beaches. Watch sunsets over quiet bay waters. Dogs are permitted in the recreation area, but must be kept on a leash and under control at all times. Bring your binoculars to view birds in the early morning or late afternoon. Look for button-quail on the sandy tracks and shorebirds (in summer). Watch for dugong, turtles and dolphins in the bay. You must bring your own firewood for campfires, but best to bring a fuel or gas stove and reduce your use of campfires.

Bird Watching - Tin Can Bay

Tin Can Bay, Gympie Area
Free Entry
The Cooloola Coast is part of the Great Sandy Strait, which is an internationally important wetland. It is an area of tidal swamps and intertidal sand and mud flats. The vegetation includes beds of seagrass, mangrove forests and saltmarsh wetlands. The Great Sandy Strait supports 38 species of shorebirds including 18 migratory species. The area is also used by other threatened species such as turtles and dugongs. The Cooloola Coast is a perfect place for shorebirds. At low tide there are extensive sand banks where the birds can search for food and at high tide there are secluded places where they can roost and rest without disturbance.

Tin Can Bay

Tin Can Bay, Gympie Area
Secluded in the midst of picturesque Tin Can Inlet, experience a tranquil getaway to this area known for its eco-tourism surroundings. Tin Can Bay is a perfect place to unwind and relax. Originally known by the aborigines as Tuncanbar, this peaceful bayside town is well known for its recreational fishing and boating pleasures. There's an excellent public boat ramp. Indeed, fishing is the major industry here, with prawning fleets based in Schnapper Creek. There's a range of accommodation options in the township, from caravan park to holiday units. Tin Can bay is about 210 kilometres north of Brisbane.

Tinnanbar

Great Sandy Strait, Fraser Coast Area
Discover one of Queensland's most beautiful and secluded beaches at the small seaside village of Tinnanbar in the Fraser Coast, with white sandy beach, clear turquoise water and stunning views to World Heritage-listed Fraser Island. Tinnanbar's safe, pure waters are perfect for swimming and sailing at all tides and a haven for sea turtles and dugongs. Tinnanbar is one of a collection of delightful seaside hamlets dotted along the shoreline of the Great Sandy Strait, a spectacular waterway located between the Fraser Coast mainland and Fraser Island. Let the pace wind back several notches by following the Great Sandy Strait Discovery Drive to these villages and surrounding national parks to discover coloured sands and sand blows, incredible birdlife, fishing and boating. For fishing enthusiasts, Tinnanabar has a number of nearby creeks and good access to offshore fishing grounds.

Rainbow Beach

Rainbow Beach, Gympie Area
This is heavenly sub-tropical, coastal country - about 107 kilometres north of Noosa - where the fishing, boating, surfing, prawning and crabbing are all sublime. Rainbow Beach, is a major entry point to the 41,000 hectare Cooloola National Park, which offers one of the great four-wheel drive excursions in Queensland. The park itself is wild and beautiful... you can even sometimes see brumbies galloping along the vast sandy expanses of Cooloola Beach. A short drive north from Rainbow is Inskip Point where there’s a ferry to take you and your car across to Fraser Island. Rainbow was originally recorded as Black Beach by the miners who extracted valuable mineral sands from the beach. According to the Kaby Dreaming, Yiningie, the spirit of the gods, often took the form of a rainbow. Yiningie was killed in a fight when he crashed into the cliffs and his spirit coloured the sands.
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