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Kowanyama

Kowanyama was once an Anglican Mission, this remote community now services travellers and is well-known as an excellent fishing location as it lies 50 kilometres inland but on the mouth of the Mitchell River.

While the fish are generally biting, be aware there are bag limits. Dogs, guns and hunting are not allowed. The Kowanyama Aboriginal Shire Council - Land and Natural Resource Unit - has established locations for camping.

Topsy Creek offers beach and river camping. There are no facilities and numbers and vehicle limits per campsite apply. That just means you get more to yourself.

Within the community there is a motel-style guesthouse and basic services such as a butcher, laundromat, supermarket with petrol and diesel supplies, a tavern, medical centre and police. Regional airlines connect with Cairns.

If you are camping, you will need to obtain a permit for bush camping from the Land and Natural Resource Unit.

Kowanyama has an Alcohol Management Plan (AMP). AMPs aim to reduce alcohol-related violence.

AMPs vary from community to community. They include alcohol restrictions, home brew bans and dry place declarations which operate within a defined boundary, known as a 'restricted area'. These strategies set the quantity and type of alcohol you may possess in the restricted area.

Penalties apply for possessing or attempting to bring illegal alcohol into a restricted area.

To find out more about AMPs for each community, visit the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs web site.

Kowanyama, Kowanyama Area
Queensland
Australia

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Kowanyama

Kowanyama, Kowanyama Area
Kowanyama was once an Anglican Mission, this remote community now services travellers and is well-known as an excellent fishing location as it lies 50 kilometres inland but on the mouth of the Mitchell River. While the fish are generally biting, be aware there are bag limits. Dogs, guns and hunting are not allowed. The Kowanyama Aboriginal Shire Council - Land and Natural Resource Unit - has established locations for camping. Topsy Creek offers beach and river camping. There are no facilities and numbers and vehicle limits per campsite apply. That just means you get more to yourself. Within the community there is a motel-style guesthouse and basic services such as a butcher, laundromat, supermarket with petrol and diesel supplies, a tavern, medical centre and police. Regional airlines connect with Cairns. If you are camping, you will need to obtain a permit for bush camping from the Land and Natural Resource Unit. Kowanyama has an Alcohol Management Plan (AMP). AMPs aim to reduce alcohol-related violence. AMPs vary from community to community. They include alcohol restrictions, home brew bans and dry place declarations which operate within a defined boundary, known as a 'restricted area'. These strategies set the quantity and type of alcohol you may possess in the restricted area. Penalties apply for possessing or attempting to bring illegal alcohol into a restricted area. To find out more about AMPs for each community, visit the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs web site.

Pormpuraaw

Pormpuraaw, Pormpuraaw Area
Visitors come from all over Australia to enjoy the excellent fishing at Pormpuraaw, on the west coast of Queensland. Situated between two rivers, Pormpuraaw features terrific estuary fishing for barramundi, threadfin salmon, grunter, bream, and others. The nearby reefs also offer great fishing. Two groups of Aboriginal people live in Pormpuraaw: the Thaayorre people who are traditionally from Pormpuraaw, and the Mungkan people who are traditionally from the North. Many traditional arts and crafts are still practiced here, such as the weaving of dilly bags, dot painting, spear making and canoe carving. The Cultural centre houses many of these artefacts. Pormpuraaw has one of the oldest crocodile farms in Australia. Set up in the 1970s when crocodiles were becoming endangered, the Edward River Croc Farm has been responsible for repopulating the local rivers - so there is no swimming in saltwater and some precautions must be taken. There's good news for birdwatchers: around 170 species of bird inhabit the sea, savannah and wetlands around Pormpuraaw. The bird population changes dramatically with the seasons as migratory birds come and go. Some locals are the crimson finch, star finch, brolga, sea eagle, hawk, and jabiru. You do not require a permit to visit Pormpuraaw, but you are required to check in at the Council Offices on arrival. As Pormpuraaw is an Aboriginal community the customs of the traditional owners must be adhered to at all times. Pormpuraaw has an Alcohol Management Plan (AMP). AMPs aim to reduce alcohol-related violence. AMPs vary from community to community. They include alcohol restrictions, home brew bans and dry place declarations which operate within a defined boundary, known as a 'restricted area'. These strategies set the quantity and type of alcohol you may possess in the restricted area. Penalties apply for possessing or attempting to bring illegal alcohol into a restricted area. To find out more about AMPs for each community, visit the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs web site.
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