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Gladstone

The city of Gladstone is developed on hills overlooking the focal point of its economic development - the natural deepwater harbour. This dynamic, modern city basks in a sub-tropical climate with islands, waterways and beaches providing year-round boating, fishing, swimming and surfing. At the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, Gladstone offers access to Heron Island, Wilson Island and uninhabited coral cays. A large charter boat fleet operates from the world class Marina.

A wide variety of restaurants and eateries cater to all tastes - from Australian tucker to Gladstone's famous mud crab and fresh seafood. All types of accommodation are available including four-star properties, comfortable and affordable motels and caravan parks.

Gladstone's Tondoon Botanic Gardens are one of Australia's few totally native botanic gardens. The display areas specialise in the plants of the surrounding and Tropical North Queensland regions. The Gladstone Entertainment Centre, at the heart of the newly renovated 'Library Square', forms the focal point of the city's cultural activities. The Gladstone Regional Art Gallery and Museum is a colonial Georgian structure which houses three exhibition areas and hosts the Region's annual Rio Tinto Martin Hanson Art Awards which draws entrants from all over Queensland.

Gladstone, Gladstone Area
Queensland
Australia

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Capricornia Cays National Park

Capricorn Coast, Livingstone Area
Free Entry
Capricornia Cays National Park protects eight coral cays which rise just a few metres above the high tide mark - Lady Musgrave, North West, Masthead, Wilson, Heron, Erskine and Tryon islands and Broomfield Cay. Their biological diversity, exceptional beauty and the endangered plants and animals they protect make them internationally significant. The cays support the largest breeding population of endangered loggerhead turtles in the South Pacific. A large percentage of the Great Barrier Reef's seabird species visit each year to nest. Go reef-walking, snorkelling, diving, birdwatching, boating or fishing. Camping is permitted on two of the eight islands. Camping fees apply and bookings are essential. Book well in advance for school holidays. Take water and a fuel stove. Seasonal closures protect breeding seabirds, turtles and vegetation. Access to Tryon Island is restricted. Check restrictions on activities such as spearfishing, anchoring, fishing and collecting.

Quoin Island

Gladstone,
Situated just five kilometres off the coast of Gladstone, is Quoin Island. An unspoilt sanctuary for wildlife, nature lovers and those seeking a secluded spot to relax and let life pass by. Anchor the boat for the day and enjoy a picnic under the shade of the pandanus and coconut palms, or be taken to the Island by ferry. The island features a fully refurbished resort which caters for families, corporate functions, weddings or an entertaining Sunday Session! The region's only turtle rehabilitation centre is also located on the Island, which is fully operated by volunteers.

Lilley's Beach

Boyne Island, Gladstone Area
Located north of Wyndham Park, Boyne Island is Lilley's Beach. This is a popular weekend camping spot for locals and tourists alike. Lilley's Beach is a sensitive foreshore area, and is carefully maintained by Boyne Smelter Ltd and Gladstone Regional Council. Access to Lilley's Beach is from the Boyne Island Sewerage Treatment Plan, via Handley Drive. Lilley's Beach extends along the coast 1.7 kilometres and may be accessed by Four Wheel Drive at low tide only. Ensure you refer to a tide timetable beforehand as the area is impassable at high tide. Permits for Vehicle use on the Beach are required and are available from Gladstone Regional Council. (Motorbikes are prohibited at all times). Camping is not encouraged, however if you wish to stay, please remember to take your own firewood. Fires are to be established well away from any bushland or grassed areas, preferably in the middle of the beach. Camping is only permitted within the fenced enclosed area at the northern end of Lilley's Beach. Look for evidence of an existing campsite in preference to creating another. Select a sandy or hard surface. The impression you leave will be almost unnoticeable on this surface.

Mount Larcom

Mount Larcom, Gladstone Area
Found about 20 minutes drive from the Gladstone Central Business District is the small rural township of Mount Larcom. Terrific for a short break during your travels, Mount Larcom has picnic areas, pubs and several takeaway and supply stores to keep you going. Try one of the famous Big Mumma's pies, pasties and sausage rolls! A short drive further north is Gladstone's most prominent natural landmark - Mount Larcom. A challenging trek up to the peak is rewarded with an uninterrupted 360-degree view of the Gladstone Area. Rural lands and the Gladstone Harbour can easily be recognised from the summit, and on a clear day you will see reef islands to the east and Rockhampton to the north. Aside from Pies and Mountains, Mt Larcom is well-known for its yearly district show which attracts around 18,000 spectators over the two days.

Southend Curtis Island

Curtis Island, Gladstone Area
Free Entry
If you love fishing, camping, boating, turtles and miles of sandy beaches and turquoise waters, then Southend Curtis Island is a must visit in the Gladstone Region. Located just 12 kilometres from the mainland and a short one kilometre walk or drive from the Curtis Island jetty. Catch the Curtis Ferry Services Ferry to Curtis Island (vehicles permitted) or arrive by private vessel. Visit 'front beach' for a dip in the Coral Sea, enjoy a picnic at the nearby campgrounds or enjoy fish and chips, meals and a cold drink from Capricorn Lodge. Enjoy birdwatching and bushwalks or explore the islands gorgeous coastline. Camping is available at Southend, however permits must be purchased from the Gladstone Visitor Information Centre.

North West Island

Gladstone, Gladstone Area
Situated approximately 75 kilometres from Gladstone, North West Island is the largest Coral Cay in the area and forms part of the Capricorn Cays National Park. North West Island offers opportunities for bushwalking, nature study, reef walking, diving and snorkelling. Being a large coral cay it has longer walking opportunities through the island and around its beaches. Fishing is also quite popular on the island. Visitors are requested to limit their fishing and you must only fish in the authorised zones. Please obtain zoning maps from QPWS Gladstone or a Visitor Information Centre. Bookings are necessary before camping on the Island and permits apply. To obtain a permit, or for further information contact the Department of Environmental Resource Management (DERM). Composting toilets are available on the Island for the convenience of campers only. Self-sufficient camping is available however, visitors are required to take their own water and a fuel stove. Also be sure to pack sturdy bags to take rubbish away with you.

Boyne Island

Boyne Island, Gladstone Area
Take a short drive south from Gladstone to the picturesque coastal communities of Boyne Island and Tannum Sands and you will experience a relaxed coastal lifestyle centred on attractive beaches, riverside walkways, parklands and recreational activities. With a population of close to 12,000, these 'twin' communities are linked by a bridge across the beautiful Boyne River. Boyne Island - the island you can drive to - offers a quality mix of residential, business, shopping, industry and environment where foreshore parks overlook boats, outrigger crews and fishing on the calm river waters. The island is also home to Australia's largest Aluminium Smelter - the State's largest user of electricity. It employs 1,300 people to produce up to 558,000 tonnes of Aluminium per year. You are welcome to learn more about this fascinating facility at the Smelter Visitor Centre. With only a small variation in seasonal water temperatures, the waters of Tannum Sands and Boyne Island are perfect for year-round swimming. The area is a popular stopover for the winter 'migration' from the south! Boyne has more than 15 kilometres of walks known as The Turtle Way, winding beside the river through bushland, dunes and parks.

Tannum

Tannum Sands, Gladstone Area
Tannum Sands is just nine kilometres from the Bruce Highway and just 20 kilometres from the city of Gladstone. Tannum Sands is renowned for its long white sandy beaches perfect for swimming, sailboarding and surf-skiing. The twin towns of Tannum Sands and Boyne Island are home to approximately 12,000 people and are linked by the John Oxley Bridge over the Boyne River, which is perfect for fishing, boating, outrigging, and water-skiing. Beautifully landscaped parklands and recreation facilities were created on this coastal foreshore area named Millennium Esplanade. Millennium Esplanade is on the main beach, where lifesavers patrol during Spring and Summer periods. With only a small variation in seasonal temperatures, the waters of Tannum Sands are perfect for year-round swimming. At southern end of the Tannum main beach is Wild Cattle Island - an untouched, National Park sand island separated from the mainland by Wild Cattle Creek.

Calliope

Calliope, Gladstone Area
Calliope is a vibrant growing community, about 20 minutes drive west of Gladstone. With a relaxed rural atmosphere, Calliope is surrounded by farms and a beautiful hinterland landscape. The area boasts a national park of rainforests and native bush, horse riding trails, bush camps, historical homesteads and lookouts with spectacular views over the entire Port Curtis area. With a population of over 4,000 the town of Calliope has country pubs, an 18-hole Country Club with a challenging golf course, and the newly constructed Calliope Central Shopping Village. Just north along the highway is the Calliope River Historical Village, taking you back many years to capture some of the early history of the Port Curtis area. Fishing enthusiasts are well catered for with boat ramps provided at Boyne Island, Tannum Sands, Calliope River and Lake Awoonga. Choice mud crabs and fish such as bream, salmon, whiting, cod and flathead can be caught from the Boyne and Calliope Rivers and the many estuaries running from these rivers. Lake Awoonga is a prime location for catching barramundi, with the bonus of being able to fish for these well-known angler prizes all year round.

Benaraby

Benaraby, Gladstone Area
With its location at the southern entrance to Gladstone, you really cannot miss Benaraby. It is a small community and fairly well known to anglers, being the gateway to Lake Awoonga, which has a pile of Barramundi waiting to be caught. The Lake is one beautiful place which must not be overlooked. But back to Benaraby. The town has fuel, food outlets, accommodation and general supplies for the traveller. There is also a small fresh Fruit and Vege Market located at the Benaraby Junction turn-off. Benaraby is also home to the popular and well-known, Benaraby Raceway, where visitors can take in spectacular motorbike, drag and street racing.
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