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Rosewood Railway Museum

Rosewood, Ipswich Area

If you head for a little place called Rosewood, tucked away in the Bremer River valley, the train is waiting for you on the last Sunday of each month. Rosewood is 50 kilometres west of the city of Brisbane and 18 kilometres west of Ipswich and is served by the electric train from Ipswich.

The town is home to the Rosewood Railway Museum that seeks to recreate the atmosphere of a typical Queensland branch line of the steam and early Diesel era. The Museum is an operating railway that includes a PB15 steam locomotive that hauls restored wooden carriages plus a variety of diesel locomotives and railmotors. The line is high in the hills above Rosewood so there are plenty of steep grades where the steam engine has to work hard.

The museum, part of the Australian Railway Historical Society Queensland Division, also has an extensive collection of restored carriages and wagons on display.

Trains run on the last Sunday of each month and the Museum is open as a static display on the other Sundays of each month. Cab rides in the vintage diesel locomotives are available around the main depot yard at Kunkala Station on running days.

Entry Costs

Entry Cost AUD Valid From Inclusions
Adult $14.00 1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016 Travel on both the Railmotor and the Steam Train.
Child $4.00 1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016 Travel on either the Railmotor or the Steam Train.

Open Times

Note: 1000 to 1600 on the last Sunday of each month. Museum opens from 1000 to 1600 other Sundays.

Facilities

  • Car park

Other Information

Accessibility:

Toilet facility for the disabled at Museum Junction Station. Standard toilet facilities at Cabanda and Kunkala stations.

Children:

Children are required to be under the control of a parent. Picnic, refreshment and souvenir facilities available at Kunkala Station.
Freeman Road
Rosewood Railway Museum
Rosewood, Ipswich Area
Queensland
Australia

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A beautiful waterfront park which is home to over 150 different species of bird. Inclusive of playground equipment, barbecues, exercise equipment and toilet facilities. Lake Apex Park is also dog friendly and has a paved walking track the entire distance around the Lake. A perfect location for your next picnic.

Grantham, Lockyer Valley

Grantham, Lockyer Valley Area
About halfway between Gatton and Helidon lies Grantham, a little village surrounded by rich farming land. The town is home to one of Australia's leading beef producers, exporting prime beef to markets around the world. In 2011, Grantham suffered severely in the January flood event. For a while, the town became a household name due to extensive media coverage. The Lockyer Valley Regional Council implemented a voluntary land swap for affected residents. The first of its kind, the swap was run as a ballot, enabling residents to exchange their land for a block on higher ground. Today, the new estate on the hill is occupied by both new and old residents in a beautifully landscaped setting. A number of parks in the area have been recently beautified and a brand new park is located within the new estate. These parks are the perfect place to stop and enjoy the surroundings, offering play equipment for the kids. Call in a say hi to friendly locals at the general store and newsagency or take a look at the newly restored Butter Factory. You will find fresh local produce at the fruit and vegetable market store as well as road-side farm stalls.

Hidden Vale Adventure Park

Grandchester, Ipswich Area
Free Entry
Hidden Vale Adventure Park at Grandchester near Ipswich brings a unique outdoor experience to the region, with a multi-use 60 kilometre trail network for mountain bike riders, runners and walkers, winding through the expansive 12,000 acre Nature Refuge property. Operating out of the luxurious getaway, Spicers Hidden Vale, it's the perfect way to explore the great outdoors in this stunning location just 30 minutes' drive from Ipswich. Access to Hidden Vale Adventure Park is free, with the sprawling property and trail network opening at 7 a.m. and closing at dusk. Users sign in and out at reception at Spicers Hidden Vale where you collect a map, and then you have a world-class trail network at your disposal to explore, with great bush scenery, kangaroos for company, and even passing by an abandoned light plane. You also have access to Spicers' top-quality food and beverage options. The Adventure Park is going through a 2-stage expansion to be completed in early 2017, and it hosts events on the property through Epic Events Management. You can participate in timed rides and races and even set up camp during the events, making it perfect for a family-friendly getaway.

Marburg

Marburg, Ipswich Area
The historic village of Marburg, west of Ipswich, takes visitors back in time to an era when the town was the bustling hub of the local area. The streets are lined with beautifully restored heritage buildings including the old German Baptist Church, Bielefeld's Store and the historic hotel built in 1879. In 2008, Marburg won the title of Friendliest Town in Queensland. Just outside of town you will find the restored two-storey plantation style mansion named Woodlands of Marburg. This grand old lady of the valley is heritage-listed and was built in 1890 as the home of a local sawmill owner, his wife and their 11 children. The mansion overlooks picturesque Marburg Valley and is surrounded by magnificent Jacaranda Trees and Bunya Pines Visitors to Marburg can enjoy exploring on foot. Look for the iconic Marburg Hotel (circa 1879); the Community Centre, formerly the town's bank; Rosewood Scrub Historical Museum with lots of early photos of the area; old Bielefeld's Store, now an antique centre; the old Police Station, courthouse and lock-up; and the Anglican cemetery, the resting place of many of the area's pioneers.. From Woodlands you can take a hot-air balloon ride over the Scenic Rim and the heritage city of Ipswich. The Great Dividing Range provides the backdrop for your breath-taking glide over the scenic countryside. There are several boutique wineries in the area that are well worth the look. You can take a tour, enjoy a delicious meal and sample a drop of award-winning wine at the cellar door. The pretty villages of Haigslea and Rosewood nearby are also of historical interest and great places to linger a while and explore. Marburg is just 45 minutes' drive from Brisbane and Toowoomba and 15 minutes from Ipswich.

Laidley

Laidley, Lockyer Valley Area
Just 60 minutes from downtown Brisbane, Laidley greets visitors with good old-fashioned hospitality in some of the richest farmlands and most magnificent scenery. There are so many attractions for visitors to enjoy, from the preserved heritage of the pioneer village, to the local arts and crafts plus the region's oldest home, Das Neumann Haus. The bed and breakfasts, motel, country style hotels, caravan and camping grounds offer visitors a wide choice of accommodation for that relaxing country break. To appreciate this beautiful region, take a scenic drive through the Laidley Valley via Mulgowie Road, or Laidley Creek Road and gaze across the colourful landscape of the valley from the region's two lookouts. Relaxing by the bank of Lake Dyer (Bill Gunn Dam), or picnicking in the Lions Park and viewing Narda Lagoon from the suspension bridge, is an idyllic getaway. Laidley has so much to share.

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Helidon, Lockyer Valley Area
The quiet hamlet of Helidon lies in the picturesque Lockyer Valley, approximately one hour west of Brisbane and just 15 minutes east of Toowoomba. Sandstone from this area has been used in many of Queensland's beautiful historic buildings. Helidon is also the business hub for explosive manufacturing companies situated on the outskirts of town For many years Helidon has been famous for its natural mineral springs prized for their great healing and therapeutic properties. The local Aborigines bathed in the spring water to ward off illness and after European settlement, the springs attracted the frail from far and wide. Arthritis, rheumatism, muscular aches, pains, stress, and a host of other ailments are said to be relieved by soaking in the warm, mineral-rich water. The grand old city of Toowoomba is just 15 minutes' drive up the range and offers a host of things to see and do. Not far from Helidon you'll also find wineries, historic homesteads, national parks and a host of scenic drives. Accommodation in the Helidon area ranges from basic cabins, bed-and-breakfasts, hotels and motels.

Grandchester

Grandchester, Ipswich Area
The tiny hamlet of Grandchester is located in the beautiful Lockyer Valley between Ipswich and Toowoomba. The pride and joy of Grandchester is the Grandchester Railway Station, built in 1865. Listed by the National Trust, the Station is significant as the terminus for the first railway line built in Queensland. Running from Ipswich to Grandchester the railway was also the first narrow gauge mainline railway in the world. Before the construction of the railway line, Grandchester was little more than a whistle-stop for travellers, and was known as Bigge's Camp. Queensland's Governor at the time, felt that a place at the centre of such a significant historical event deserved a more dignified name, and so renamed the site Grandchester. Visitors can experience the days of the steam engine at Grandchester's Model Steam Railway (open the first Sunday of each month from 10.00am to 3.00pm) by riding scale models of steam (and diesel) locomotives. Not far from the railway station, the historic buildings of an old homestead have been restored and converted into a luxury resort - right in the heart of a working cattle station. Here amidst the clean country air, guests can experience the workings of a real farm. The nearby villages of Rosewood and Laidley are of equal historical significance with heritage buildings lining the streets and charming aspects making them well worth a look. Grandchester is located approximately 45 minutes west of Brisbane and 20 minutes from Ipswich.

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