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Capricornia Cays National Park

Capricorn Coast, Livingstone Area

Capricornia Cays National Park protects eight coral cays which rise just a few metres above the high tide mark - Lady Musgrave, North West, Masthead, Wilson, Heron, Erskine and Tryon islands and Broomfield Cay. Their biological diversity, exceptional beauty and the endangered plants and animals they protect make them internationally significant. The cays support the largest breeding population of endangered loggerhead turtles in the South Pacific.

A large percentage of the Great Barrier Reef's seabird species visit each year to nest. Go reef-walking, snorkelling, diving, birdwatching, boating or fishing. Camping is permitted on two of the eight islands. Camping fees apply and bookings are essential. Book well in advance for school holidays. Take water and a fuel stove. Seasonal closures protect breeding seabirds, turtles and vegetation. Access to Tryon Island is restricted. Check restrictions on activities such as spearfishing, anchoring, fishing and collecting.

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Family friendly – please refer to operator's website for services and facilities.
Capricornia Cays National Park
Capricorn Coast, Livingstone Area
Queensland
Australia

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Mount Larcom Climb

Mount Larcom, Gladstone Area
Free Entry
The prominent and distinctive peak of Mount Larcom is visible to the north-west from most points in Gladstone, with its summit is 632 metres above sea level. Matthew Flinders noted it when he explored Port Curtis, naming it after Captain Larcom under whom he had served. Because of its profile, it is often call "The Lion Mountain", resembling a lion and lioness facing each other. The prominent landmark provides a good ascent of two hours or so. The reward is a 360-degree view of the Gladstone area, rural lands and the harbour. On a clear day, you will see reef islands to the east and Rockhampton northwards. Mt Larcom is of volcanic origin, and your walk takes you through light eucalypt forest and grass trees. Subject to fitness, generally 5 hours should be allowed to complete the climb. It is a challenging walk, and best climbed in the cooler months, with an early start to capture the best views. The walk and climb is steep in places and is not recommended for younger children. No toilet facilities. It is advisable to check the local weather condition on the day of your climb as the peak can be shrouded in cloud.

Lilley's Beach

Boyne Island, Gladstone Area
Located north of Wyndham Park, Boyne Island is Lilley's Beach. This is a popular weekend camping spot for locals and tourists alike. Lilley's Beach is a sensitive foreshore area, and is carefully maintained by Boyne Smelter Ltd and Gladstone Regional Council. Access to Lilley's Beach is from the Boyne Island Sewerage Treatment Plan, via Handley Drive. Lilley's Beach extends along the coast 1.7 kilometres and may be accessed by Four Wheel Drive at low tide only. Ensure you refer to a tide timetable beforehand as the area is impassable at high tide. Permits for Vehicle use on the Beach are required and are available from Gladstone Regional Council. (Motorbikes are prohibited at all times). Camping is only permitted within the fenced enclosed area at the northern end of Lilley's Beach. Look for evidence of an existing campsite in preference to creating another. Select a sandy or hard surface. The impression you leave will be almost unnoticeable on this surface. Please remember to take your own firewood. Fires are to be established well away from any bushland or grassed areas, preferably in the middle of the beach.

Southend Curtis Island

Curtis Island, Gladstone Area
Free Entry
If you love fishing, camping, boating, turtles and miles of sandy beaches and turquoise waters, then Southend Curtis Island is a must visit in the Gladstone Region. Located just 12 kilometres from the mainland and a short one kilometre walk or drive from the Curtis Island jetty. Catch the Curtis Ferry Services Ferry to Curtis Island (vehicles permitted) or arrive by private vessel. Visit 'front beach' for a dip in the Coral Sea, enjoy a picnic at the nearby campgrounds or enjoy fish and chips, meals and a cold drink from Capricorn Lodge. Enjoy birdwatching and bushwalks or explore the islands gorgeous coastline. Camping is available at Southend, however permits must be purchased from the Gladstone Visitor Information Centre.

Capricornia Cays National Park

Capricorn Coast, Livingstone Area
Free Entry
Capricornia Cays National Park protects eight coral cays which rise just a few metres above the high tide mark - Lady Musgrave, North West, Masthead, Wilson, Heron, Erskine and Tryon islands and Broomfield Cay. Their biological diversity, exceptional beauty and the endangered plants and animals they protect make them internationally significant. The cays support the largest breeding population of endangered loggerhead turtles in the South Pacific. A large percentage of the Great Barrier Reef's seabird species visit each year to nest. Go reef-walking, snorkelling, diving, birdwatching, boating or fishing. Camping is permitted on two of the eight islands. Camping fees apply and bookings are essential. Book well in advance for school holidays. Take water and a fuel stove. Seasonal closures protect breeding seabirds, turtles and vegetation. Access to Tryon Island is restricted. Check restrictions on activities such as spearfishing, anchoring, fishing and collecting.

Curtis Island

Curtis Island, Gladstone Area
This is rugged exploration at its best - Four Wheel Drive tracks to remote and secret fishing spots, back to basics bush camping, beaches, sparkling ocean, wilderness and wetlands. Curtis Island is accessible by private boat or by a regular ferry service; although once on the island and camping you will need a Four Wheel Drive to get around. Camping is permitted halfway up the east coast at the sand blow at Yellow Patch, not far from the Cape Capricorn lighthouse. More accessible for campers (just one kilometre from the barge landing point) is the grassy campground on the outskirts of the community of Southend. Southend has some accommodation and eating options available for day trips or longer stays. Birders will be in spotting heaven with jabirus, rainbow lorikeet parrots, cockatoos, herons, brolgas, sea eagles, wood ducks, black swans, and the rare yellow chat all inhabiting the island. The aptly named Turtle Beach is home to the third largest flatback turtle rookery in Queensland so if you are visiting between October to March you may see nesting and hatching on the shore. This island has seen many changes in its years, from a working cattle station, current liquefied natural gas hub and with plans to develop a luxury resort on the island in the future, it could just be the Gladstone region's best kept secret.

Wilson Island

Gladstone, Gladstone Area
Wilson Island is currently closed however contact Delaware North Group in regards to future availability. Wilson Island is located just above The Tropic of Capricorn, approximately 72 kilometres off the Queensland coast, northeast of Gladstone and 15 kilometres from nearby Heron Island. Wilson Island is one of the smaller coral cay’s on the Great Barrier Reef – a secluded paradise. As part of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef, Wilson Island is an idyllic paradise home to soft white sand beaches, pristine waters and lush forest and sustains an incredibly important ecosystem. With abundances of nature, Wilson Island is any nature lover’s paradise! Those that are drawn to Wilson Island will enjoy the natural beauty of our Great Barrier Reef island, its seclusion and the freedom from modern-day living are part of the appeal.

Tannum Sands

Tannum Sands, Gladstone Area
On a stunning part of the Gladstone Region Coastline, you will find the twin towns of Boyne Island and Tannum Sands. Year round swimming due to pretty consistent temps make this a water-sports paradise with stand up paddle-boarding, jet-skis, wind surfers, paragliders and more dotting the shoreline. The landscaped and lush green of the foreshore and esplanade makes this a very family friendly area with barbecues, playground and fitness station areas dotted along nearly 20 kilometres of Turtleway Bikeway connecting all the major facilities of both Boyne Island and Tannum Sands. Excellent fishing is not too far away at the famed Lake Awoonga stocked with the elusive and big Barra and Mangrove Jack and access to offshore reefs is also near at hand. Where the forest meets the sea, you can set up for a day under the shade of the trees dotted along the shore and make the most of the great South East in this gem only 20 minutes from Gladstone.

Gladstone

Gladstone, Gladstone Area
Gladstone might be best known for its impressively large multi commodity port, but there are some hidden gems in this industrial powerhouse waiting to be found. Island wonders, rural hinterland, coastal lifestyle and heaps of top fishing and boating spots, Gladstone is the perfect place to kick back and discover both man-made and natural marvels at work. Take a stroll through one of the few Australian completely native botanic gardens a place of relaxation, inspiration and recreation. The gardens are specially cultivated with a variety of tropical, sub-tropical and dry rainforest plants and flowers. Head to the home of one of Australia's most coveted art prizes at the Gladstone Regional Art Gallery in the heart of the city. Here you can access a variety of touring exhibitions, workshops and other fun activities for free. Go for a dip at Barney Beach and learn about the first settlers that landed there in 1847 or treat the kids to the splash zone at the aquatic centre. You can take a tour of Australia's largest Bauxite processing plant or if you are a bit of an electro-maniac learn about where a quarter of Australia's electricity comes from with a tour of the facility. Tuck into some fresh food or pack a picnic and enjoy it at one of the many parks and recreational areas dotted around the city. If you want a day trip then take the ferry over to Curtis Island where you can camp, boat, fish or Four Wheel Drive in this unique part of the Central Queensland coast. There are hidden surprises around every corner so get out and make the most of them in this city of powerhouse proportions.

Boyne Island

Boyne Island, Gladstone Area
Take a short drive south from Gladstone to the picturesque coastal communities of Boyne Island and Tannum Sands and you will experience a relaxed coastal lifestyle centred on attractive beaches, riverside walkways, parklands and recreational activities. With a population of close to 12,000, these 'twin' communities are linked by a bridge across the beautiful Boyne River. Boyne Island - the island you can drive to - offers a quality mix of residential, business, shopping, industry and environment where foreshore parks overlook boats, outrigger crews and fishing on the calm river waters. The island is also home to Australia's largest Aluminium Smelter - the State's largest user of electricity. It employs 1,300 people to produce up to 558,000 tonnes of Aluminium per year. You are welcome to learn more about this fascinating facility at the Smelter Visitor Centre. With only a small variation in seasonal water temperatures, the waters of Tannum Sands and Boyne Island are perfect for year-round swimming. The area is a popular stopover for the winter 'migration' from the south! Boyne has more than 15 kilometres of walks known as The Turtle Way, winding beside the river through bushland, dunes and parks.
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