0
0

Basalt Byways

Hughenden, Flinders Area

The Basalt Byway is a four wheel drive track winding between the landscapes north of Hughenden. This track takes you on a journey through some amazing country, featuring rolling walls of basalt, creating deep meandering valleys.

Excellent lookouts show the depth and length of many of the valleys you will wind through. One lookout in particular is over an open downs area with the township of Hughenden in the distance.

These track travels through many grazing properties. These properties used to be mainly sheep stations but they've since changed to cattle grazing. History tells stories of pioneering families who lost everything in the great floods that swept through these valley areas many years ago.

Facilities

  • Pets allowed, enquire on booking
37 Gray Street
Hughenden, Flinders Area
Queensland
Australia

Find What's Nearby

Choose a category:
Places to Visit
Displaying 1-10 of 10
Sort by:
Show:

Porcupine Gorge National Park

Hughenden, Flinders Area
Free Entry
In this park, towering sandstone cliffs and lush vine-forest fringing Porcupine Creek provide a striking contrast with surrounding flat plains. Porcupine Gorge is an impressive canyon that has been carved into the landscape by the eroding action of Porcupine Creek, revealing strata of sedimentary rocks spanning hundreds of millions of years. In the wider section of the gorge the creek has also created the Pyramid, an isolated monolith of multicoloured sandstone rising from the floor of the gorge, shaped as its name suggests. The gorge is a great place for viewing wildlife, especially birds. Take the 2.4 kilometre return walk along the track to the base of the gorge, to explore the sculpted sandstone and deep pools of the gorge floor. Enjoy the bird calls and look for wallaroos and red kangaroos. Take an easy walk through sparse open woodland to the Pyramid lookout for scenic views over the gorge. Set up camp in the camping area and enjoy the solitude of the outback.

Historic Coolabah Tree

Hughenden, Flinders Area
Free Entry
The Historic Coolabah Tree is situated past the causeway on the right as you head to the Hughenden Showgrounds. It is of immense historical importance as it is linked to two relief expeditions searching for the Burke and Wills Expedition. Both expeditions blazed the tree on the banks of what is now Station Creek. In 1861 Fredrick Walker led a team from Rockhampton to the Gulf searching in vain for the missing explorers. The following year Landsborough's search party passed through from the Gulf. These relief expeditions led people to become aware of the fertility and wealth of the plains adjacent to the Flinders River. Truly this tree should be preserved as a memorial to the brave explorers of this land. Two plaques have been erected near the tree as a tribute to them.

Basalt Byways

Hughenden, Flinders Area
Free Entry
The Basalt Byway is a four wheel drive track winding between the landscapes north of Hughenden. This track takes you on a journey through some amazing country, featuring rolling walls of basalt, creating deep meandering valleys. Excellent lookouts show the depth and length of many of the valleys you will wind through. One lookout in particular is over an open downs area with the township of Hughenden in the distance. These track travels through many grazing properties. These properties used to be mainly sheep stations but they've since changed to cattle grazing. History tells stories of pioneering families who lost everything in the great floods that swept through these valley areas many years ago.

Bush Tucker Garden

Richmond, Richmond Area
Free Entry
Situated on the banks of award winning Lake Fred Tritton this garden is a joint project involving the Richmond Shire Council as well as the local indigenous and non-indigenous community and the dedication of the CDEP workers. All plants are native to the region and are labelled with their traditional purposes, helping to promote the educational aspects of indigenous culture. The garden's waterfall represents the birthplace of Richmond's water flowing from the basalt country to the white gravel. Gidgee stones and moonrocks complete the gardens.

Richmond Fossil Hunting Sites

Richmond, Richmond Area
Free Entry
After exploring the Prehistoric World at Kronosaurus Korner, they have the ideal place for you to visit. The fossil hunting sites are approximately 12 kilometres to the north of Richmond and are easily accessible to all vehicles. You don't require any digging tools - in fact most people don't have any equipment and still manage to make wonderful finds. Some of the fossils that are found in the area include belemnites, fish bones and scales, inoceramus shells and shark teeth. Fossickers are reminded that you are more than welcome to bring your discoveries back to Kronosaurus Korner for identification.

Lake Fred Tritton

Richmond, Richmond Area
Free Entry
In 2004 Lake Fred Tritton won the State and National Heart Foundation Awards for offering a better quality of life for people living in rural communities. The lake has provided Richmond locals and visitors the opportunity to participate in water sports such as fishing, skiing, canoeing and jet skiing - not normally found in small remote inland communities. The lake boasts sandy beaches, shaded playground facilities, water park, paved walking track, free barbecue facilities and clean amenities. The initial water used to fill the lake was pumped out of the Flinders River whilst it was in flood. Today it is kept topped up via a sphere point to the river, as required. The lake is stocked with over 18 species of fish by the Richmond Fish Stocking Association and monitored by the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries. Species include red claw yabbies, barramundi, sooty grunter, sleepy cod, archer fish, forktail catfish and golf grunter. Funding of the lake was sponsored by the Richmond Shire Council in partnership with the Queensland Government Major Recreational Facilities Funding program.

Stamford

Stamford, Flinders Area
Stamford is situated 61 kilometres south of Hughenden on the Kennedy Development Road to Winton, dubbed the 'Dinosaur Way'. Named after the adjoining pastoral land 'Stamford Ham'. Stamford was originally part of the 'Katandra Station'. Stamford is a town steeped with Outback history and was once an overnight stop for Cobb and Co Coaches travelling from Hughenden to Winton. A rail line to Stamford was opened on the 13 December 1897 and became a busy railhead for local wool graziers. The Stamford of today is a much more relaxed place with a population of three people and a newly built roadhouse. Stamford comes alive at its annual Race Meeting held each year in July. Many people travel to enjoy this Outback experience, the charm and excitement of a real country race meeting. Stop in and have a 'cuppa' at the Stamford Roadhouse. You'll enjoy the refreshing break and a chat.

Hughenden

Hughenden, Flinders Area
Visit 'Hughie', the seven-metre Muttaburrasaurus and an impressive fossil collection at the Flinders Discovery Centre. While you are there, relive the glory days of sheep production and its subsequent demise in the 'Shearing Straggler' exhibit. A small entry fee applies. Follow the windmill blades through the streets of Hughenden, exploring the Outback history and art features of the town. Meet 'Mutt', a full-bodied Muttaburrasaurus replica along the way. Just outside Hughenden, Mount Walker rises out of the flat back soil plains, proving a great location for grazing across town and around the district. Further afield, Porcupine Gorge National Park is a spectacular gorge often referred to as Australia's 'Little Grand Canyon'. The first lookout gives you and indication of the depth and magnitude of the gorge and is a 'must see' for all visitors. Camping grounds are located at the Pyramid Lookout; campers should take their own water and be full self-sufficient. Contact Parks and Wildlife for permits. The Basalt Byway is a scenic drive plotted through the picturesque volcanic basalt countryside, boasting excellent lookouts and an abundance of flora and fauna. For the four wheel driving enthusiasts, the Eromanga Sea Byway traces the edge of the prehistoric inland sea and is a fossil fossicker's delight! Make the sandy crossing on the Flinders River Byway and reward yourself with a cold drink at the pub. Fossicking enthusiasts will delight in the Chudleigh Park Gemfields. Peridot, rare sapphires and black spinel are generally found in this area. Whilst general permission for fossicking and camping has been given to holders of fossicking licences, please check at the Flinders Discovery Centre prior to arrival. Hughenden is located half-way between Townsville and Mount Isa on the Flinders Highway, North West Queensland. Hughenden is situated on the banks of Queensland's longest river, the Flinders. The town is located above the Great Artesian Basin.

Richmond

Richmond, Richmond Area
Imagine being in a place so diverse, so vast, you feel an indescribable sense of freedom. From the plains of the downs country to the silvery shimmer of the sun shining on the gidgee trees in the forest country, Richmond is often referred to as an oasis in the Outback. Crossing the rolling downs country of north west Queensland, originally opened to white settlement by the explorer William Landsborough in 1862, the township of Richmond is a welcome sight on the horizon. Situated on the Overlander’s Way halfway between Townsville and Mount Isa, the town is located on the bank of Queensland's longest river, the Flinders, and is known for its recreational Lake Fred Tritton and bougainvillea-lined streets, parks and gardens. Lake Fred Tritton is conveniently located at the edge of town. With a 1.2 kilometre circumference and a maximum depth of eight metres, Lake Fred Tritton allows visitors and locals the opportunity to enjoy a wide range of water sports. Richmond is home to the award-winning major attraction Kronosaurus Korner, where you will find the only museum in Australia primarily dedicated to displaying marine reptiles, as well as a very special dinosaur. Minmi, with impressions of its fossilised skin, is considered to be Australia's best preserved dinosaur skeleton. Minmi takes pride of place alongside the Richmond Pliosaur skeletons. This fossil, found in 1989, has to be seen to be believed. If you find that you are infected with 'fossil fever' after visiting Kronosaurus Korner, call at reception for a map to guide you through the region's designated fossicking sites. If stepping back in time is more your scene, then take a heritage walk around the town, viewing the signs depicting yesteryear. Pay your respects to the pioneers that shaped this country at the Pioneer Cemetery, relax in the Lions Park, visit the Cambridge Ruins 40 kilometres out of town, or take a walk along the Flinders River.

Corfield

Corfield, Winton Area
A tiny historic Outback town it may be, with its resident population of seven, but it has a big heart. A former Cobb and Co Coach staging point, Corfield is the social centre for local graziers and their families. The Corfield Pub identifies this small community, which is dependent on the cattle and sheep industries along with some tourism. Corfield has a rich history with links to the Great Shearers' Strike. But the latest claim to fame is probably its proximity to the dinosaur skeleton of a 20 to 30 tonne sauropod that once grazed the area. Corfield is located 83 kilometres north-west of the frontier town of Winton. Travelling the fully sealed Winton to Hughenden road you are likely to be greeted by the tumbleweeds. Play a game of tennis, get a cricket match going on the local cricket pitch or just relax in the hospitable atmosphere. Magical moments can be experienced viewing the incredible sunsets, sitting under the night sky, enjoying a brilliant view of the stars, moon, and the occasional passing unidentified flying object. The Corfield Races are held each year at the beginning of August. There is plenty of room on site free of charge for caravan and tent dwellers or just roll out your swag. Stay overnight and enjoy a full evening of entertainment with music and the Quickshears Competition. A recovery session the next morning encourages overnighters to rally and join the locals as they celebrate the success of the previous day. A less formal event but equally entertaining and welcoming, is when the Western Picnic Race Club conducts a two day event around April. At these races you will experience flag starts and a mix of amateur and professional jockeys. Experience adventure, country life and outback hospitality in this remote rural community.
No Results Message
Displaying 1-10 of 10
Sort by:
Show:

Explore the Region