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Whitula Gate Museum

Windorah, Barcoo Area

Free Entry 

The Whitula Gate Museum is based around an original slab hut built by the Rabbit Board in 1906 as a boundary riders' hut. The hut was moved to its present location in 1996 to be used as the centre point of the museum. The museum has been designed to re-create an 1800s homestead. The museum has household and station equipment as well as aboriginal artifacts on display. Combined with the museum is the Windorah Information Centre, it is a great place to stop, revive and collect local information.

Facilities

  • Car park
  • Conference/Convention Facilities

Activities

  • Lessons/Tutorials

Other Information

Accessibility:

There is access for persons with a disability.

Children:

Children are welcome.
7 Maryborough Street
Windorah, Barcoo Area
Queensland
Australia

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Whitula Gate Museum

Windorah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
The Whitula Gate Museum is based around an original slab hut built by the Rabbit Board in 1906 as a boundary riders' hut. The hut was moved to its present location in 1996 to be used as the centre point of the museum. The museum has been designed to re-create an 1800s homestead. The museum has household and station equipment as well as aboriginal artifacts on display. Combined with the museum is the Windorah Information Centre, it is a great place to stop, revive and collect local information.

J.C. Ruins

Windorah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
John Costello was empowered by John Collin and Son of Melbourne to secure land for the Collins family. It was during one of these early exploring trips that John stopped here and carved his initials (or was it J.C. for John Collin) on the famous JC tree while he was waiting for his billy to boil. A hotel was built nearby at a later date, and when Surveyor G.T. Weale laid out a township in 1884, he gave it the name Canterbury, because the Post Master General's Department would not accept J.C. as a town name. The township and the run was officially named Canterbury, but the hotel continued to be referred to as "The J.C.". The hotel and township of Canterbury have long disappeared and all that is left is the small remains and cemetery. The tree on which John carved his initials has long gone. The hotel was a pise building, the rammed earth walls were marked and painted to resemble larger rectangular stone blocks.

Red Sandhills

Windorah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
The Red Sandhills ten kilometres west of Windorah on the Birdsville Road are the reddest that you will find anywhere. They may not be very high, but they are worth stopping to admire, especially for photographers. The sandhills continually change colours throughout the day. The best time to see them is at sunset. It's an ideal place to have a drink or two and watch the sun go down and the moon come up at the same time. Along with the sounds of silence, the view and your own company - what better way to take away the stress. The children will also use up their excess energy running up and sliding down the sandhills. And don't worry, the red sand brushes off.

Windorah Nature Drive

Windorah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
The Nature Drive is a 12 kilometre off-road drive from Windorah to Coopers Creek that passes through a variety of country including Gidgee woodlands, Spinifex grasslands and floodplains to finish the drive at Coopers Creek. There are around 38 different flora with common name plates as well as a number of points of interest along the way. The drive will join the Quilpie Road at the bridge over Coopers Creek. Pick up a fact sheet from the Information Centre before you leave. Although called a 'drive' it is a good easy afternoon walk for hikers. Just ask at the Information Centre if you need to be dropped off at the start or picked up at the finish.
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