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The Outback Way

Winton, Winton Area

Free Entry 

The Outback Way extends 2,750 kilometres from Laverton, Western Australia to Winton, Queensland via central Australia. As a self-drive route it passes through central Australia’s deserts, Ayers Rock, The Olga’s, Alice Springs and a host of fascinating places of interest.

The Outback Way is made up of seven inter-connecting roads including The Great Central Road (Western Australia); Tjukaruru Road, Lasseter Highway, Stuart Highway and Plenty Highway (Northern Territory); and Donohue Highway and Min Min Byway (Queensland). Collectively these are The Outback Way.

The Outback Way offers travellers the opportunity to enjoy some of Australia’s icons as well as life in the outback, remote and rugged landscapes and an adventurous journey travelling across outback Australia. The Outback Way is all about the journey and enjoying the unspoilt wonders of Australia’s central deserts and remote outback.

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Kennedy Developmental Road
Winton, Winton Area
Queensland
Australia

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The Outback Way

Winton, Winton Area
Free Entry
The Outback Way extends 2,750 kilometres from Laverton, Western Australia to Winton, Queensland via central Australia. As a self-drive route it passes through central Australia’s deserts, Ayers Rock, The Olga’s, Alice Springs and a host of fascinating places of interest. The Outback Way is made up of seven inter-connecting roads including The Great Central Road (Western Australia); Tjukaruru Road, Lasseter Highway, Stuart Highway and Plenty Highway (Northern Territory); and Donohue Highway and Min Min Byway (Queensland). Collectively these are The Outback Way. The Outback Way offers travellers the opportunity to enjoy some of Australia’s icons as well as life in the outback, remote and rugged landscapes and an adventurous journey travelling across outback Australia. The Outback Way is all about the journey and enjoying the unspoilt wonders of Australia’s central deserts and remote outback.

Stamford

Stamford, Flinders Area
Stamford is situated 61 kilometres south of Hughenden on the Kennedy Development Road to Winton, dubbed the 'Dinosaur Way'. Named after the adjoining pastoral land 'Stamford Ham'. Stamford was originally part of the 'Katandra Station'. Stamford is a town steeped with Outback history and was once an overnight stop for Cobb and Co Coaches travelling from Hughenden to Winton. A rail line to Stamford was opened on the 13 December 1897 and became a busy railhead for local wool graziers. The Stamford of today is a much more relaxed place with a population of three people and a newly built roadhouse. Stamford comes alive at its annual Race Meeting held each year in July. Many people travel to enjoy this Outback experience, the charm and excitement of a real country race meeting. Stop in and have a 'cuppa' at the Stamford Roadhouse. You'll enjoy the refreshing break and a chat.

Middleton

Middleton, Winton Area
Middleton was named after the first white man in the district. He was a member of the 1862 expedition led by John McKinlay. The town started life as a coach staging post and now consists of the Middleton Hotel, which has been recently restored. Eighty-four kilometres west of Middleton on the Winton Road are the ruins of the Min Min Hotel, built in the late 1880s and burnt down in the 1920s. Its name has been given to a mysterious light that is seen throughout the western border areas. The first recorded sighting of the Min Min Lights took place at the ruins of the hotel and some locals believe that the lights originated in the nearby graveyard and have a supernatural connection. If you are planning a day trip from Winton or en route to Boulia, then it is a must to stop at the Cawnpore Lookout at the Lilyvale Hills. Don't forget your camera!

Corfield

Corfield, Winton Area
A tiny historic Outback town it may be, with its resident population of seven, but it has a big heart. A former Cobb and Co Coach staging point, Corfield is the social centre for local graziers and their families. The Corfield Pub identifies this small community, which is dependent on the cattle and sheep industries along with some tourism. Corfield has a rich history with links to the Great Shearers' Strike. But the latest claim to fame is probably its proximity to the dinosaur skeleton of a 20 to 30 tonne sauropod that once grazed the area. Corfield is located 83 kilometres north-west of the frontier town of Winton. Travelling the fully sealed Winton to Hughenden road you are likely to be greeted by the tumbleweeds. Play a game of tennis, get a cricket match going on the local cricket pitch or just relax in the hospitable atmosphere. Magical moments can be experienced viewing the incredible sunsets, sitting under the night sky, enjoying a brilliant view of the stars, moon, and the occasional passing unidentified flying object. The Corfield Races are held each year at the beginning of August. There is plenty of room on site free of charge for caravan and tent dwellers or just roll out your swag. Stay overnight and enjoy a full evening of entertainment with music and the Quickshears Competition. A recovery session the next morning encourages overnighters to rally and join the locals as they celebrate the success of the previous day. A less formal event but equally entertaining and welcoming, is when the Western Picnic Race Club conducts a two day event around April. At these races you will experience flag starts and a mix of amateur and professional jockeys. Experience adventure, country life and outback hospitality in this remote rural community.
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