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Terrestrial Georgetown Centre

Georgetown, Etheridge Area

At the Terrestrial Centre in Georgetown you will find located the multi award winning, Terrestrial - the Ted Elliott Mineral Collection. This collection, which is all the work of one man, Ted Elliott, contains over 4,500 mineral specimens in a myriad of fascinating colours and shapes from the region and throughout the world. This unique display is set out in nine themed rooms each with its own audiovisual component. A must see for any traveller this collection will amaze you with its beauty and sheer size.

Whilst at the Terrestrial Centre you will be able to get up to date Tourist Information at the fully accredited Visitor Information Centre. Make tour booking for the Undara Lava Tubes and Cobbold Gorge as well as other significant tourist attractions in the region, browse artwork of the region only on display at the centre, use the Internet cafe and generally relax in the cool building. Take time to browse and shop in our gift shop.

A visit to the web site for the Gulf Savannah Region will help you plan your trip to the region to maximise your enjoyment of the many unique world class attractions available.

Entry Costs

Entry Cost AUD Valid From Inclusions
Adult $8.00 1 April 2014 – 30 June 2016 All Entry into The Ted Elliott Mineral is AUD8. Children under 16 are free.

Open Times

Note: Open 0830 to 1630 Monday to Friday October to March. Open 0800 to 1700 seven days April to September. Open out of hours for groups of 10 or more by prior arrangement.

Facilities

  • BBQ Facilities
  • Car park
  • Tour Desk

Other Information

Accessibility:

Facilities are available including ramp access, parking, toilet facilities and Internet access for guests with a disability.

Children:

Children are welcome and child rates are available. Children under 16 years of age are free.
Low Street
Georgetown, Etheridge Area
Queensland
Australia

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Richmond Fossil Hunting Sites

Richmond, Richmond Area
Free Entry
After exploring the Prehistoric World at Kronosaurus Korner, they have the ideal place for you to visit. The fossil hunting sites are approximately 12 kilometres to the north of Richmond and are easily accessible to all vehicles. You don't require any digging tools - in fact most people don't have any equipment and still manage to make wonderful finds. Some of the fossils that are found in the area include belemnites, fish bones and scales, inoceramus shells and shark teeth. Fossickers are reminded that you are more than welcome to bring your discoveries back to Kronosaurus Korner for identification.

Bush Tucker Garden

Richmond, Richmond Area
Free Entry
Situated on the banks of award winning Lake Fred Tritton this garden is a joint project involving the Richmond Shire Council as well as the local indigenous and non-indigenous community and the dedication of the CDEP workers. All plants are native to the region and are labelled with their traditional purposes, helping to promote the educational aspects of indigenous culture. The garden's waterfall represents the birthplace of Richmond's water flowing from the basalt country to the white gravel. Gidgee stones and moonrocks complete the gardens.

Richmond

Richmond, Richmond Area
Imagine being in a place so diverse, so vast, you feel an indescribable sense of freedom. From the plains of the downs country to the silvery shimmer of the sun shining on the gidgee trees in the forest country, Richmond is often referred to as an oasis in the Outback. Crossing the rolling downs country of north west Queensland, originally opened to white settlement by the explorer William Landsborough in 1862, the township of Richmond is a welcome sight on the horizon. Situated on the Overlander’s Way halfway between Townsville and Mount Isa, the town is located on the bank of Queensland's longest river, the Flinders, and is known for its recreational Lake Fred Tritton and bougainvillea-lined streets, parks and gardens. Lake Fred Tritton is conveniently located at the edge of town. With a 1.2 kilometre circumference and a maximum depth of eight metres, Lake Fred Tritton allows visitors and locals the opportunity to enjoy a wide range of water sports. Richmond is home to the award-winning major attraction Kronosaurus Korner, where you will find the only museum in Australia primarily dedicated to displaying marine reptiles, as well as a very special dinosaur. Minmi, with impressions of its fossilised skin, is considered to be Australia's best preserved dinosaur skeleton. Minmi takes pride of place alongside the Richmond Pliosaur skeletons. This fossil, found in 1989, has to be seen to be believed. If you find that you are infected with 'fossil fever' after visiting Kronosaurus Korner, call at reception for a map to guide you through the region's designated fossicking sites. If stepping back in time is more your scene, then take a heritage walk around the town, viewing the signs depicting yesteryear. Pay your respects to the pioneers that shaped this country at the Pioneer Cemetery, relax in the Lions Park, visit the Cambridge Ruins 40 kilometres out of town, or take a walk along the Flinders River.

Kynuna

Kynuna, McKinlay Area
Kynuna was established in the 1860s and in its early days boasted three hotels. It was a staging post for Cobb and Co Coaches. Today Kynuna has just one hotel, the famous Blue Heeler Hotel. Kynuna is most famous for its links with Banjo Paterson and the 'Waltzing Matilda' poem. Folklore has it that Bob MacPherson (owner of Dagworth Station) told Banjo the story of the suicide of Samuel Hoffmeister beside the Combo Waterhole, 13 kilometres upstream of the Diamantina River, in September 1894. Hoffmeister had reportedly been one of the striking shearers involved in the burning down of the Dagworth Woolshed. This story, together with other stories which Paterson had heard, inspired him to write 'Waltzing Matilda', at Dagworth. Christina MacPherson, Paterson's then fiancee, adapted a popular Scottish tune 'Craiglea' to become the original music for 'Waltzing Matilda'. Combo Waterhole, situated a few kilometres south of Kynuna, is reportedly the site of the famous billabong in Australia's national folk song. A 2.5 kilometre round trip takes you on a walk along cobbled paths to this waterhole, situated on the Diamantina River. Here you can enjoy a bush picnic or walk through the dry channels of the Diamantina to the famous waterhole, crossing historic stone-pitched overshots built by Chinese labourers more than a century ago.

Einasleigh

Einasleigh, Etheridge Area
Einasleigh in the 21st century is only a small community - there are no shops however there is a hotel where you can purchase food. You can also top up fuel here or get food from the roadside caravan takeway, under a massive tamarind tree thought to be more than a century old. This old copper town on the Savannah Way alternate route offers some points of interest. The Copperfield Gorge is a major feature with deep, cool chasms and quiet beaches. Peak your geological interest by counting consecutive lava flows at the Gorge, created from the McBride Volcanic Province. In the 21st century you reach the community an the alternate route south of Georgetown and Mt Surprise. Once it was the centre of industry. In 1900 base metal prices were high and copper deposits were developed here and at Ortona. The Chillagoe Company established a smelter and created a private rail link from Almaden and then on to Forsayth and Charleston. Einasleigh became a stop on the line when it was completed in 1910. Travel by road or by the Savannahlander rail service to this township.

Forsayth

Forsayth, Etheridge Area
Sometimes history is more bizarre than fiction. Forsayth was once paved in gold - in a manner of speaking. Part of the Etheridge Goldfield, this area was known as 'Poor Man's Goldfield' as a prospector did not need expensive equipment to search for gold. Nugget gold was literally found on the ground. Many of the towns within this goldfield rose and fell quickly, strikes were short-lived with always the promise of another fortune. Temporary corrugated iron buildings were pulled down and transported by wagon to the new instant town. The once-private rail link from Chillagoe to Forsayth assured the town's permanency. The historic link is now part of the Savannahlander rail journey. Forsayth offers a hotel with accommodation, caravan park with cabins, post office, police station, hospital and fuel stop. You can depart the Savannah Way alternate route to Cobbold Gorge and Agate Creek Mineral Reserve.

Croydon

Croydon, Croydon Area
Croydon, situated in the heart of the Gulf Savannah country (Savannah Way), is a small town with a big history that started with the discovery of gold in 1885. Start at Croydon's True Blue Visitor Information Centre which houses significant collections of heritage items, information displays, an audio visual in its theatre and an internet service. The centre can direct you to the outdoor heritage displays, a mining machinery collection and grand old heritage buildings. Grab your self-guided brochure and enjoy the Croydon story. Croydon's Heritage Precinct with police station, jail, Sergeant's residence, town hall and courthouse, the oldest building in Croydon (circa 1887) are open and free for visitors to wander through. The Mining Museum has an operable 'stamper' on the original Iguana Consul Mine. Croydon had a large population of Chinese settlers. Archaeologists rediscovered the Croydon Chinese Temple site. The Gulflander train travels from Normanton to Croydon weekly, providing an historic journey. Lake Belmore, situated only four kilometres from Croydon, offers Barramundi fishing all year! It is the ideal spot for recreational activities. The town has a range of services including accommodation, caravan park, cafe/supermarket, roadhouse/post office and the longest continuous running general store in Queensland (1894).

Mount Surprise

Mount Surprise, Etheridge Area
Mount Surprise is a railway town on the Cairns to Forsayth Railway and is the first town within the Gulf Savannah encountered by visitors approaching from the east. It is a centre for gem fossicking, with quantities of topaz, quartz, spinel, garnet, cairngorm and aquamarine to be found. Mount Surprise sits on the edge of an immense lava flow from an ancient volcano to the south east. The surrounding country is flat, wooded savannah grasslands, with isolated hills. The Gulf Savannah is an interesting region to visit all year, however, during the monsoon season, transportation methods must be carefully considered, as some parts of the Gulf Savannah region suffer from a lack of road infrastructure. By car, Mount Surprise lies about 4 hours' drive south-west of Cairns.

Georgetown

Georgetown, Etheridge Area
Situated west of the Newcastle Range, Georgetown is the centre of the Etheridge gold field and of amateur gold prospecting. The surrounding area is covered with rolling hills and wooded savannah grasslands. Georgetown is an intersection point for all roads approaching the Gulf Savannah region from the east with the exception of the Chillagoe to Normanton/Karumba route. The township is well serviced and is a major point for touring circuits to the south and east which direct visitors through spectacular scenic and historic points of interest. The Gulf Savannah is an interesting region to visit all year round. There is an all weather road from Cairns which is not affected by rain during the monsoon season, however, if travelling by road from the south or west during the wet season, transportation methods must be carefully considered, as some parts of the Gulf Savannah region suffer from a lack of road infrastructure. Georgetown is about 380 kilometres west of Cairns.

Lake Fred Tritton

Richmond, Richmond Area
Free Entry
In 2004 Lake Fred Tritton won the State and National Heart Foundation Awards for offering a better quality of life for people living in rural communities. The lake has provided Richmond locals and visitors the opportunity to participate in water sports such as fishing, skiing, canoeing and jet skiing - not normally found in small remote inland communities. The lake boasts sandy beaches, shaded playground facilities, water park, paved walking track, free barbecue facilities and clean amenities. The initial water used to fill the lake was pumped out of the Flinders River whilst it was in flood. Today it is kept topped up via a sphere point to the river, as required. The lake is stocked with over 18 species of fish by the Richmond Fish Stocking Association and monitored by the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries. Species include red claw yabbies, barramundi, sooty grunter, sleepy cod, archer fish, forktail catfish and golf grunter. Funding of the lake was sponsored by the Richmond Shire Council in partnership with the Queensland Government Major Recreational Facilities Funding program.
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Note: Information on listed products and services are provided by the operator and were correct at the time of publishing. Rates are indicative based on the minimum and maximum available prices of products and services. Please visit the operator’s website for further information. All prices quoted are in Australian dollars (AUD).