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Lake Monduran

Gin Gin, Bundaberg Area

Free Entry 

Lake Monduran is located 20 kilometres north of Gin Gin on the Bruce Highway and four kilometres east down Monduran Dam Road. The lake is the largest impoundment in Australia with both Bass and Barramundi species available all year round with its peak being from mid September through to April each year.

Covering 5,342 hectares the lake has a shoreline of 400 kilometres and travels 32 kilometres upstream from the dam itself making Lake Monduran the fifth largest dam in Queensland. With facilities such as powered and un-powered camping sites, self contained air conditioned cabins, kiosk, laundry, picnic areas, barbecues, boat ramp, and boat hire, it makes great fun for the whole family.

Facilities

  • BBQ Facilities
  • Car park
  • Kiosk
Monduran Dam Road
Gin Gin, Bundaberg Area
Queensland
Australia

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Coongarra Rock

Biggenden, North Burnett Area
Free Entry
For Four Wheel Drive enthusiasts, Coongarra Rock and Falls provide an opportunity to explore rocky outcrops, caves, rock pools and natural vegetation. It is possible to climb the rock but should only be attempted by fit and experienced bushwalkers. It is situated 24 kilometres south of Biggenden and Coalstoun Lakes. Lords Road is the turn off to Coongarra Rock. The road goes to within a short distance of this spectacular outcrop in a dry scrubby State Forest. The road to the falls branches off the road to Coongarra Rock and goes within walking distance of the top of the falls. The roads should only be attempted by Four Wheel Drive vehicles. These roads can be dangerous after heavy rain and care should be taken at all times.

Mount Walsh National Park

Biggenden, North Burnett Area
A prominent landmark in the Biggenden region is the granite bluff area of Mount Walsh, in the northern part of mountainous Mount Walsh National Park. Exposed granite outcrops, rugged ridges and steep forested slopes support a range of vegetation. Follow the 300 metre trail from the picnic area through open eucalypt forest to a rocky creek gully fringed in rainforest, then on to lookouts over surrounding countryside. With caution, experienced walkers can take the strenuous (unmarked) two and a half hour hike to Mount Walsh's bare granite summit. You will be rewarded with stunning views.

Coalstoun Lakes

Coalstoun Lakes, North Burnett Area
Coulstoun Lakes rises 200 metres above a broad cultivated valley, Mt Le Brun, an extinct volcano, contains two large craters which form shallow lakes. Formed more than 600,000 years ago, the mountain is one of the youngest volcanic formations in Australia. Protected by Coalstoun Lakes National Park, the lakes were named after Coalstoun in Scotland by Wade Brun, manager of nearby Ban Ban Station. Perfect for those wanting to observe nature or participate in some birdwatching, visitors can park at the base and make their way up the side of the crater for views and spectacular rural scenery.

Mount Perry

Mount Perry, North Burnett Area
Mount Perry settlement began in the late 1840s with the taking up of large sheep grazing stations, mining activity began in the 1860s and the discovery of rich copper deposits led to a mining boom. Today there is still mining activity in the town. One of the most interesting sites in the Mount Perry area is the Boolboonda Tunnel, despite the fact that it extends 192 metres into the rock, it is unlined and unsupported. In fact it has the dubious distinction of being the longest unsupported tunnel in the Southern Hemisphere. The tunnel was originally built in 1883 for the railway line between Bundaberg and Mount Perry to service the copper mines. Now it is home to a colony of bent-winged bats and used to access residential properties. You can explore the tunnel at your leisure. Mount Perry is 100 kilometres north west of Bundaberg and is home to an array of arts and cultural experiences that can be had at the Pat Augustine centre and Bicentennial museum. There is an active Mount Perry Arts Group that facilitate an annual exhibition in September. Any history buffs can check out the smelter slag heap mining site, heritage walk and survey the view from the Normanby and Schuh lookouts. Some major sporting events are the twice-yearly Mount Perry Races, the annual Mount Perry Mountain Bike Cup and Mount Perry Woodchop, all drawing large crowds.

Apple Tree Creek

Apple Tree Creek, Bundaberg Area
Apple Tree Creek is a convenient stop on the way to either Bundaberg or Gin Gin, just outside of Childers. A family-friendly picnic ground with great facilities is on the left as you enter Apple Tree Creek from the south. Almost diagonally opposite is the Flying High Flora and Fauna Bird Habitat, on the corner of the Bruce Highway and Old Creek Road. It's the creation of John Woodall, an ex-farmer with a penchant for birds, who has created the largest walk-through free flight aviary in the country. Other highlights include Sticky Beaks Cafe for homemade jams and preserves made from local produce. Check out the purpose-built Swiss-designed wood-fired pizza oven.

Cordalba

Cordalba, Bundaberg Area
Cordalba is home to a fantastic Bed and Breakfast just off the highway which offers fresh sea perch fishing opportunities and local produce from their seasonal stall as well as a great range of accommodation. If you aren't the fishing type, then there is a fantastic, historic pub and locals reckon you should check out the Mango Tree Church on Hodges Road. Cordalba is surrounded by the Cordalba State Forest which is characterised by it's rugged hills of open eucalypt woodland, this park is an adventurer's retreat. You can spotlight for possums and gliders at night and go mountain biking or birdwatching during the day. There are mountain biking trails which are frequented that can be accessed by taking the turn-off to Cordalba via Claytons Road and then turn left onto Promisedland Road. The turn-off to Promisedland mountain bike trail network is approximately three kilometres along this road.

Gin Gin

Gin Gin, Bundaberg Area
Gin Gin - gateway to the bush, barra fishing and the Bundaberg region. The main street offers a fantastic trip into yesteryear with buildings dating from the 1900's set alongside the beautified, long median strip. Gin Gin has become an international fishing destination with the success of the Lake Monduran which has been stocked with native barramundi which grow to over one metre and over 30 kilograms. The Wide Bay Region has a sub-tropical climate. They have a good rainfall of approximately 1001 millimetres, a mild and dry winter with average temperatures ranging between 10 and 22 degrees, and summer temperatures ranging between 20 and 32 degrees. Summer is also their wet season (December to March). These wonderful climatic conditions make it possible to enjoy the outdoors throughout the year. The town of Gin Gin provides direct access to Bundaberg from the Bruce Highway. Lovely gardens divide the wide streets and historic buildings are a reminder of Queensland's pioneering past. Visitors can explore the natural rural countryside and fields of sugarcane with vineyards and olive groves emerging as new horticultural industries. Nearby Lake Monduran provides a relaxing waterside location - popular for fishing and camping. The Goodnight Scrub National Park offers wilderness camping and panoramic drives over unsealed roads. Nearby Mt Perry township and Boolboonda Tunnel provide a scenic look into the region's mining past and present. Motels, caravan parks and camping facilities cater for all visitors. Wild Scotchman Week is held annually in the last week of March and is a fun and unique celebration of Queensland's only true bushranger - James McPherson - guaranteed to keep everyone entertained. Gin Gin is a convenient rest stop when travelling between Brisbane and Rockhampton and features accommodation, casual restaurants and takeaways, museum and visitor information centre.

Childers

Childers, Bundaberg Area
Two iconic images spring to mind when you talk about Childers - rich red volcanic soil and the rows of macadamia trees, which greet you coming in and leaving the heritage filled town. The main street (the Bruce Highway which turns into Churchill Street) is lined with historical colonial buildings, which are set amongst the shady, large leopard trees. Here you can taste lots of local produce from the regions four wineries and sample some of the local famous ice-cream while passing through. Make sure you pop into the Old Pharmacy Museum which was originally established in 1894 as the town's first pharmacy. It houses an enormous collection of potions and hand made medications among the original fixtures and other educational components. There is also Childers Arts Space (Charts) for lovers of art and the Military Memorabilia Museum which is one of the best displays of military memorabilia outside of Canberra. Childers is a great access point into the North Burnett and also toward the coast to Woodgate and if you continue northward Apple Tree Creek and onto Bundaberg.

Biggenden

Biggenden, North Burnett Area
Biggenden rests in a dramatic landscape below the rugged cliffs of Mount Walsh on the Isis Highway 339 km north of Brisbane and just over one hour's drive from the coastal regions of Bundaberg. Settled originally as a service town to the gold fields of Paradise and Shamrock in the 1880s, Biggenden is now famous for it's history and life on the land. There are a range of facilities and services available with a diverse variety of natural and adventurous experiences to be had. Among the must do's for Biggenden are a visit to the museum, Beirs' Park which hosts a public art work dedicated to past industries of the region, Chowey Bridge, Coongarra Rock and Falls for four wheel driving enthusiasts and the beautiful Waterfall Creek Rock Pools at Utopia.

Gayndah

Gayndah, North Burnett Area
Gayndah lays claim to being the oldest towns in Australia, founded in 1849 maintaining its old fashioned charm today. Several buildings have been heritage listed including Mellors Drapery (one of the few buildings in Australia which still uses a flying fox to deal with transactions), old section of the State School, Gayndah Soldier's Memorial
Hall (Town Hall and Council Chambers), Racecourse and several rail bridges. Sheep and mining brought settlers into 
the area, but it was the drier, less humid climate, rich volcanic and alluvial soils and plenty of sunshine that set the area up as a prime citrus growing centre and is popular during the cooler months of May to August with local and visiting fruit pickers. Gayndah is famous for it's biennial Orange Festival which is a celebration of the abundant citrus produce which comes from the region. Among the many historical points of interest, the Gayndah Art Gallery, Gayndah Museum with it's extensive display dedicated to the Queensland Lungfish (or Ceratodus)Archers Lookout and the town clock are all worth a mention. Gayndah is part of the Burnett Circle Touring Route and can be visited as part of a six day drive tour to take in all of the rural and authentic Australian experiences as part of the North Burnett.
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