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Isla Gorge National Park

Taroom, Banana Area

Free Entry 

A panorama of sculpted sandstone cliffs, peaks and outcrops greets visitors to Isla Gorge National Park - the striking rock formations and maze of gorges changing colour with the movement of the sun.

Spring wildflowers, rare plants and rock-wallabies can be seen. Eucalypt forests hug the ridge-tops while dry rainforests cling to gullies and shaded slopes. Watch wedge-tailed eagles and peregrine falcons riding breezes and honeyeaters feeding on wattles. Have fun finding familiar shapes in strange rock formations. Drive to Flagstaff Hill to see the remains of a hand-paved road built in 1864 .

Camp overnight or have a picnic overlooking the gorge. (Beware of loose cliff edges when walking around the camping and picnic areas or on the short track to a small natural lookout).

Open Times

Public Holiday: Open 24 hours, seven days a week. ......

Facilities

  • Car park

Other Information

Children:

Children are welcome. Supervise children closely - stay well back from cliff edges as they may crumble unexpectedly.

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Mount Scoria Conservation Park

Thangool, Banana Area
Free Entry
Rising 150 metres above cultivated plains, Mount Scoria is a striking landmark near Biloela in the Banana Shire. Formed by volcanic activity 20 to 26 million years ago, this volcanic plug features many-sided basalt columns. Known as the 'Musical Mountain', Mount Scoria is one of only three prehistoric rock formations in the world which were originally the core of a volcano. When the basalt columns are struck (carefully) by another rock, musical notes ring out over the plain. Hence the term, Musical Mountain. Take the short cultural track to view the mountain and learn about its significance to the Gangulu people. Have a picnic, go birdwatching or barbecue at the picnic area.

Nuga Nuga National Park and Lake Nuga Nuga

Rolleston, Central Highlands Area
Free Entry
Lake Nuga Nuga (adjacent to Nuga Nuga National Park) is the largest natural water body within the Central Queensland Sandstone Belt. It provides a valuable habitat for waterbirds, and in the right season flowering waterlilies are a sight to behold. The lake can dry up in times of drought. Bird watchers will find the lake a haven for pelicans, swans and numerous water birds. Lake Nuga Nuga National Park contains Mount Warinilla (offering views over the lake and park) and protects remnants of dry rainforest scrub in a area that has been extensively cleared. A bush camping site, with no facilities, is located in the park on the banks of Lake Nuga Nuga. As this park is remote, be sure to bring adequate supplies of food, water and fuel.

Isla Gorge Lookout

Theodore, Banana Area
Free Entry
At the southern end of the Dawson Range, Isla Gorge National Park protects spectacular sandstone scenery. Here, among a complex maze of gorges, sandstone outcrops and striking rock formations change colour throughout the day. Isla Gorge Lookout is the ideal spot to watch the sunset over the orange-coloured cliffs of the gorge. From the picnic area, you follow a rough trail to the lookout over Isla Gorge and the valley below. The plateau has brilliant wildflower displays in spring. From the lookout you can see wedge-tailed eagles and peregrine falcons soaring above the gorge or honeyeaters splurging on wattle, eucalypt, boronia and grevillea flowers from mid-winter to summer. Take your binoculars and look for whiptail wallabies and grey kangaroos in the valley below.

Cania Gorge National Park

Monto, North Burnett Area
Free Entry
Towering cliffs, ancient caves and sheltered gorges are highlights of this park, which preserves a valuable remnant of the Brigalow Belt, Aboriginal freehand art and varied habitats for wildlife. Brigalow forest, eucalypt woodland, cypress pine woodland, dry rainforest and grassland are found in this park, which is also home to more than 90 species of birds. Enjoy a picnic and find out about the park's wildlife, vegetation and history beside pretty Three Moon Creek. Bushwalkers can choose from eight walks of varying length and difficulty. Take an easy amble on the Picnic Area circuit along Three Moon Creek or take the longer Shamrock mine site walk to find out about the area's past. Tackle the more difficult Castle Mountain track and be rewarded by lovely views of the gorge. Watch for platypus in the creek and peregrine falcons soaring above cliffs.

Kroombit Tops National Park

Biloela, Banana Area
Free Entry
Kroombit Tops National Park - a spectacular hinterland experience that showcases the regions true beauty. 800 metre high sandstone cliffs, waterfalls, inspiring landscapes, sweeping gorges, peaceful creeks and the only known home of the Kroombit Tinkerfrog, a critically endangered species. Just 85 kilometres from Gladstone, Kroombit Tops National Park is a 4WD enthusiasts dream, with a number of touring routes available to explore the varying features of the hinterland. Take a day trip, or camp overnight for a more leisurely journey (fees apply). The rugged terrain of the Kroombit Plateau is the resting place of a World War II B-24D Liberator bomber which crashed on a rainy night in 1945, and all on board lost their lives. Drive the four wheel drive scenic loop and walk 700 metres (return) to the plane's crash site.

Expedition National Park

Taroom, Banana Area
Free Entry
Expedition National Park - in the Central Queensland Sandstone Belt - is a park of rugged gorges, spectacular views, remote campsites, wildflowers, wildlife and a rich human history. It protects a wealth of Aboriginal cultural sites, locations named by explorer Ludwig Leichhardt in 1844 and remnants of pastoral heritage. At Robinson Gorge section in the east, cabbage palms, bottlebrush and wattles line scenic Robinson Gorge as it winds 14 kilometres between sheer sandstone cliffs up to 100 metres high. From Starkvale camping area, follow walking tracks to Robinson Gorge lookout, Shepherd's Peak or to a natural lookout over the Cattle Dip - a spectacular permanent waterhole in the gorge. Watch Australian king-parrots and rainbow lorikeets feed in summer, and golden whistlers and grey fantails in winter. Lonesome and Beilba sections in the west lie on the border of the Carnarvon Range. Panoramic views, brigalow and softwood scrubs are a feature while wildflowers provide splashes of colour through the Beilba section in late winter and spring. Squatter pigeons occur in open woodlands and wallaroos can be seen. No toilets are provided and facilities are limited. Visitors to Expedition must be totally self-sufficient. Bring drinking water and sufficient fuel for your trip.

Isla Gorge National Park

Taroom, Banana Area
Free Entry
A panorama of sculpted sandstone cliffs, peaks and outcrops greets visitors to Isla Gorge National Park - the striking rock formations and maze of gorges changing colour with the movement of the sun. Spring wildflowers, rare plants and rock-wallabies can be seen. Eucalypt forests hug the ridge-tops while dry rainforests cling to gullies and shaded slopes. Watch wedge-tailed eagles and peregrine falcons riding breezes and honeyeaters feeding on wattles. Have fun finding familiar shapes in strange rock formations. Drive to Flagstaff Hill to see the remains of a hand-paved road built in 1864 . Camp overnight or have a picnic overlooking the gorge. (Beware of loose cliff edges when walking around the camping and picnic areas or on the short track to a small natural lookout).

Lake Murphy Conservation Park

Taroom, Banana Area
Free Entry
Nestled beneath the low Murphy's Range in the central highlands, Lake Murphy remains largely unchanged from the days when Europeans first passed this way. Lake Murphy provides a seasonal refuge for waterbirds. This perched lake fills only when nearby Robinson Creek overflows, and has been dry five times in the past two centuries. The shaded, grassy campsites near Lake Murphy are a great place to spend the night and watch the sun set over the lake. Even when the lake is dry, this is a peaceful and beautiful spot. Lake Murphy Conservation Park has one circuit track, which is four kilometres return and takes approximately one hour. Walk 300 metres from the picnic and camping area to the shores of Lake Murphy. A four kilometre circuit track skirts the lake's southern shore before following Robinson Creek through forest red gums and returning through woodland to the picnic area. Lake Murphy is north of Taroom on the road to Expedition National Park.

Goovigen

Goovigen, Banana Area
Nestled among some of the regions rural farming properties, Goovigen is one of the smaller townships within Banana Shire, with a population of just 287 people. Originally set up as a supply depot for the railways, it now forms an intricate part of a rich agricultural area with surrounding properties farming cotton, cattle and grain. Located just 52 kilometres from Biloela and approximately 121 kilometres south west of Rockhampton, the name Goovigen came from the Aboriginal word for Box Tree, a species of Eucalypt. Once a hive of activity for farmers and graziers, Goovigen has developed into the ideal tranquil retreat for travellers wanting a peaceful escape. The well maintained sports grounds provides camping with showers, toilets and barbeques nestled under the shade of numerous large trees. Goovigen's hidden treasures are easily accessible from this camping area. The town's historical society has transformed the School of Arts into a time capsule on stumps. Inside the restored corrugated iron hall, the walls are lined with panels full of stories about pioneers and families who made the district what it is today. Goovigen is also home to a collection of groups that have a passion for sport including the Goovigen Pony Club, Indoor Bowls and Tennis Club. The tiny town is blessed with numerous lovely renovated buildings and manicured gardens, one - the peaceful 'Willey's Walk' park is a used to host Anzac Day parades and other special functions. Several kilometres north of Goovigen, hidden out in the bush, is a pleasant surprise. Lake Victoria is a refreshing retreat with shady trees, a wide expanse of water, water birds and other wildlife. It is a popular spot amongst locals for water skiing, swimming or fishing, but usually is deserted, making it an ideal location to hide away from the world.

150th Meridian

Moura, Banana Area
Free Entry
Located one kilometre east of Moura on the Dawson Highway, the 150th Meridian marker shows the position of the imaginary line (150 °E) on which Queensland (Eastern Standard) time is based. At the time of the equinox, a day is exactly 12 hours long anywhere on the Meridian line. The meridian line in Greenwich represents the Prime Meridian of the world, Longitude Zero (0° 0' 0"). Every place on the Earth is measured in terms of its angle east or west from this line. 'Holey rocks' like the ones at the Meridian Marker can be found all around Moura. They are a product of the process used for blasting of rock in Coal Mining. Take a sighting through the holes and you're looking along the 150th Meridian.
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