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Heritage Trail Wyandra

Wyandra, Paroo Area

Free Entry 

The heritage trail is a tribute to the early architectural styles and building materials of early pioneers. The buildings are a reflection of varying social and economic status of the people. The late 1800s were a boom time when the railway was being built. However, the itinerant railway workers moved on and wool became the main industry. There were several huts built on the outskirts of town, made from flattened kerosene tins these huts are no longer standing - but the tins can still be seen. The trail includes Edmund Kennedy's Camp 18 and follows the river to the popular local 'beach'.

The Heritage Trail book is available from the Visitor Information Centre in Cunnamulla and Charleville or from the Gladstone Hotel in Wyandra.

Facilities

  • BBQ Facilities
  • Car park

Other Information

Children:

Children welcome.
Through the town of Wyandra
Wyandra, Paroo Area
Queensland
Australia

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Lake Bindegolly National Park

Thargomindah, Bulloo Area
Free Entry
Lake Bindegolly National Park is a remote but accessible park on the edge of Queensland's channel country. This park is a bird and sunset-watcher's paradise, distinguished by desert landscapes, a string of salt and freshwater lakes, thousands of waterbirds and a rare tree. Acacia ammophila, a large gidgee-like tree with golden flowers clustered in balls, grows along sand dunes fringing the eastern side of the lakes. Camping is permitted on a reserve just outside the park, but not on the park itself. From the park entrance, walk four and a half kilometres to the lakeside bird-viewing site. See swans, pelicans, and (possibly) rare freckled ducks. Continue along the 9.2 kilometre circuit track as it skirts the lake's edge and returns via scrub-covered sandhills. Look for wedge-tailed eagles and Major Mitchell cockatoos. Tiny marsupials seek shelter in the samphire plants at the lake edge. At home in the park are tiny box-patterned geckos, skinks, painted dragons and sand goannas.

Tregole National Park

Morven, Murweh Area
Free Entry
In semi-arid, south-western Queensland, Tregole National Park straddles the boundary between two of the state’s natural regions, the brigalow belt and the mulga lands. The park protects a small, almost pure stand of ooline Cadellia pentastylis, an attractive dry rainforest tree dating back to the Ice Ages. Ooline has been extensively cleared and is now uncommon and considered vulnerable to extinction. Tregole’s ooline forest survives in the less than ideal semi-arid conditions. Mulga grows on the ridges while poplar box woodlands cover the alluvial plains, brigalow woodlands grow on areas with heavy clay soils and Mitchell grasslands are found on the park’s undulating plains.

Welford National Park

Jundah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
In Welford National Park, wind-blown sand dunes form a dramatic contrast to white-barked ghost gums, golden-green spinifex and delicate wildflowers. The Barcoo River, with its large permanent waterholes, dissects Mitchell grass plains and arid mulga woodlands. Remnants of Aboriginal heritage and use, including water wells and stone arrangements, are found throughout the park. A rare pise (rammed earth) homestead, built on this former grazing property in 1882, is now staff quarters. Watch wildlife, including colourful Major Mitchell cockatoos, mallee ringnecks and red-winged parrots. Red and grey kangaroos and wallaroos are a common sight at Welford. Drive the self-guided scenic tracks around the park. Go fishing (size and big limits apply). Enjoy bush camping at Little Boomerang or Trafalgar waterholes, on the Barcoo River. Camping fees apply.

Idalia National Park

Blackall, Blackall-Tambo Area
Free Entry
Amid the gorges and rocky formations of the Gowan Range tablelands, Idalia National Park protects extensive mulga woodlands, the Bulloo River's headwaters and threatened wildlife. Seven species of macropods, including yellow-footed rock-wallabies and endangered bridled nailtail wallabies live here. 15 native species of fuchsia grow here. Explore the park on the self-guided drive. Enjoy panoramic views from Emmet Pocket lookout. Murphy’s Rockhole, a shady gorge, is a good place for wildlife watching. Visit Old Idalia, an old mustering camp and stockyards. Walk to the wave-shaped cliff overhang. Bush camp at the peaceful Monk's Tank camping area, hidden in mulga woodlands. Camping fees apply. Go spotlighting. Photographers will delight in the vivid sunsets.
Free Entry
The Eulo – Hungerford – Thargomindah Four Wheel Driving Track is 280 kilometres long and takes approximately two days to complete. Highlights include: Currawinya National Park, Paroo River, Bulloo River, Palm Grove Date Farm and Winery and the Wild Dog Fence. Travelling through Mulga scrub, swamplands and wildflowers in season, this road provides opportunities for bushwalking, camping fishing birdwatching and access to Currawinya National Park. Saline and freshwater lakes, over 180 species of birds, the bilby fence, historical ruins and Aboriginal scatters are all featured. Stop in at a Great Outback Pub or even stay on a working station.

Cameron Corner Loop

Thargomindah, Bulloo Area
Free Entry
The Cameron Corner loop is an ideal way to experience the real Outback. This journey will leave you breathless, passing through open gibber plains where you can see for miles to sandy undulating land. The Cameron Corner loop offers contrasting landscapes and experiences. You can discover the history of the early pioneers, enjoy the wildlife, fish in the Cooper or simply relax and absorb the Spirit of Adventure. Highlights of the Cameron Corner Loop include: Noccundra Hotel; Wilson River; Cameron Corner; 'The Yellow Bus'; Bollards Lagoon; Innamincka and Cooper Creek; Burke and Wills Dig Tree; and Gas and Oil Fields. The Cameron Corner Loop is 831 kilometres and can take up to four days to complete.

Currawinya National Park

Hungerford, Bulloo Area
Free Entry
In Currawinya National Park, waterbirds and migratory shorebirds are drawn in their thousands to globally important wetlands in the otherwise dry and dusty mulga lands of south-western Queensland. With more than 200 bird species, large kangaroo species and reptiles, wildlife watching in this park is a stunning experience. The park is also home to a population of greater bilbies enclosed within a 25 square kilometre predator-proof fence. Drive (four wheel drive only) to saline Lake Wyara and freshwater Lake Numalla early in the morning. Fish, or simply relax under a shady tree, along the Paroo River. Bush camp at Ourimperee Waterhole behind the Woolshed or near the old Caiwarro Homestead site on the Paroo River. Visit cultural heritage sites. This park is remote. Visitors need to be well prepared and self-sufficient in fuel, food and drinking water.

Dowling Track

Thargomindah, Bulloo Area
Free Entry
The Dowling Track - a journey of discovery. Travel in the footsteps of Vincent James Dowling and other early pioneers over 100 years ago discovered this area, known as the “Plains of Promise”- people travelled the track looking for a new life and new opportunities. The Australian author, Henry Lawson walked from Bourke to Hungerford and back in the hellish summer heat looking for work. The Dowling Track is Four Wheel Drive experience linking Back ‘o’ Bourke and beyond to Quilpie in South West Queensland, total kilometres, 567. Immerse yourself in the rich and diverse heritage as you travel this unspoilt land. See the stars stretch for-ever, it is where your journey becomes more important than your final destination.

Hebel Historical Circle

Hebel, Balonne Area
Free Entry
In the little town of Hebel it feels like time has stood still, leaving behind tales of the Ned Kelly gang, Cobb & Co, and dance halls. Hebel's interesting history has been narrated through the public art piece, the Hebel Historical Circle. Out of the red earth, tall timber posts hover over ten illustrated signs; each telling their own story of Hebel's history. Complete with play equipment, there is something to keep everyone occupied.

Red Sandhills

Windorah, Barcoo Area
Free Entry
The Red Sandhills ten kilometres west of Windorah on the Birdsville Road are the reddest that you will find anywhere. They may not be very high, but they are worth stopping to admire, especially for photographers. The sandhills continually change colours throughout the day. The best time to see them is at sunset. It's an ideal place to have a drink or two and watch the sun go down and the moon come up at the same time. Along with the sounds of silence, the view and your own company - what better way to take away the stress. The children will also use up their excess energy running up and sliding down the sandhills. And don't worry, the red sand brushes off.
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