Welcome to

Brisbane

Blessed with sunny days and plenty of action, Brisbane is one of the fastest growing capital cities in the world but is uncomplicated, laid-back and fun-loving. 

We love the great outdoors

If you’re sitting inside, you’re doing it wrong. Brisbane’s year-round subtropical setting is best enjoyed with the grass beneath your feet and the sun on your back.

Brisbane comes alive each day as its subtropical temperatures call people from their beds year round to wake up and smell the coffee, soak up the sunshine and drink in the view of the winding Brisbane River.

  • Walk through the City Botanic Gardens and dine alfresco along Eagle Street Pier.
  • Climb the Story Bridge and abseil down the side, James Bond style.
  • Run the 107 steps at the Kangaroo Point Cliffs… or just have a barbecue overlooking the city as the sun goes down.

High-culture, no pretension

Experience the festival buzz of South Bank, with markets, bars, restaurants, live performances and Australia’s only inner-city beach, providing the ultimate free playground.

  • Watch Broadway shows and explore the museums and art galleries of the Cultural Precinct.
  • Discover independent dance, theatre and comedy in Fortitude Valley’s eclectic performance spaces.
  • Shop in boutique-filled inner-city boroughs – each with their own special personality.

Get outta town

There are plenty of decidedly un-city places to explore within a short drive of Brisbane.

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Places to Visit
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The Boondall Wetlands lie on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe. The wetlands include more than 1000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, salt marshes, melaleuca, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. This track passes through mangroves fringing the shores of Moreton Bay and the banks of Nudgee Creek. Birdlife abounds in the mangroves and a bird hide overlooks the tidal flats at the creek mouth. If you walk at low tide you will notice that these flats are vital feeding grounds for shorebirds. High and low tides in the mangroves reveal two very different worlds.
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On Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island), the largest of Moreton Bay's islands, Naree Budjong Djara National Park features sand dunes, one of the world's most ecologically important wetlands, endangered heathlands and freshwater lakes. Naree Bunjong Djara means 'My Mother Earth' to the island's Traditional Owners - the Quandamooka People. Blue Lake section protects Karboora (Blue Lake) an area of particular cultural significance. Walk the 5.2 kilometre (return) track to the lake through wallum woodlands, flowering heath and stunted eucalypts. Take your camera and binoculars to capture and zoom in on glimpses of wildlife, but please respect the Quandamooka people by not swimming in the lake. In spring enjoy the wildflowers. Walk to Neembeeba lookout (6 kilometre return) for views over the southern part of the island, the Pacific Ocean and the Gold Coast. North Stradbroke Island is reached by ferry from Brisbane.
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Boondall Wetlands lies on the edge of Moreton Bay between Nudgee Beach, Boondall and Shorncliffe and includes more than 1,000 hectares of tidal flats, mangroves, saltmarshes, melaleuca wetlands, grasslands, open forests and woodlands. The Indigenous Australians have lived at Boondall Wetlands for a long time and continue to have links with this land. The Nurri Millen art totems in the wetlands celebrate this culture. Boondall Wetlands has a diversity of wildlife. Mammals that live there include flying foxes, bats, possums and squirrel gliders. There are also a variety of frogs, reptiles and butterflies to be found within the reserve. An amazing variety of birdlife can also be found throughout the diverse vegetation types including mistletoe birds, tawny frogmouths, eastern curlews, kingfishers, rainbow bee-eaters, grass owls and wrens. At low tide, shorebirds feed on the mudflats. Cormorants, darters, egrets, ibis and herons can be seen year round. The Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre offers a range of displays and activities on the environmental and cultural heritage of the reserve for park visitors and organised groups. A track map brochure for Boondall Wetlands Reserve can be obtained from the Brisbane City Council Contact Centre.
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Eagleby Wetlands provides an important habitat for waterbirds and reptiles, and is located adjacent to the Albert River. Featured in the wetlands are varied bird habitats such as melaleuca and brackish swamps, a freshwater lake, woodland, cane fields, and open grassland. More than 200 Australian native bird species have been recorded in the area, including 19 of the 24 Australian Raptors, and almost half of the bird species found in Queensland.
Nestled amongst the foothills of World Heritage-listed, Mt Barney National Park, Mt Barney Lodge is a unique country escape that offers a variety of accommodation and Eco Accredited adventure activities. Their award winning activities are diverse, educational, and are tailored to suit participants of different ages, fitness levels and abilities. Activities range from a Sunset Eco Walk for the nature lovers; exciting interpretative activities for the children such as the famous Kids Night Adventure; or guided walks up Mt Barney, rock climbing or abseiling for the adventure seeker. For those wanting to explore on their own, the surrounding national park offers spectacular views, endangered wildlife, rare plants and cascading rivers all at the back door of Mt Barney Lodge. Why not come and explore on your own, with a friend, or allow them to lead you into the depths of this precious World Heritage-listed National Park.
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Moreton Bay is home to approximately 600 bottlenose dolphins and each evening as the sun begins to set across the water, a small pod makes their way to the shores of Tangalooma Island Resort. Since 1992, resort guests have had the opportunity to hand feed the dolphins as part of the Tangalooma wild dolphin feeding program. Currently up to 11 dolphins frequent the shores of Tangalooma, hunting, surfing and playing with fellow pod members. The jetty at Tangalooma is the perfect platform for viewing and observing these wild dolphins as they continuously entertain all with their inquisitive antics. A dedicated Dolphin Care Team records the dolphins’ behaviour each evening, monitoring growth, behaviour and interactions. Included in selected accommodation and day cruise packages is the opportunity to wade into the water to feed these playful creatures. Day guests travelling on the Dolphin Adventure Tour also have the chance to participate in this unforgettable experience.
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The Coomera circuit is located in the Binna Burra section of Lamington National Park. This stunning national park covers 20,590 hectares and boasts extensive walking tracks along the McPherson Range, which allow visitors to explore the area's forests, creeks and waterfalls. Dramatic lookouts afford views over the Gold Coast, south-east Queensland and northern New South Wales. Lamington is part of the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Area (formerly known as CERRA), which includes the most extensive areas of subtropical rainforest in the world. The scenic Coomera circuit passes through subtropical and warm temperate rainforest and giant brush box forest of Lamington National Park. The gorge is 160 metres deep. Views from the lookout platform provide dramatic evidence of the power of erosion, which has cut through a thick resistant rhyolite lava flow. The circuit climbs beside Coomera Gorge, crossing the river several times before rejoining the Border Track and returning to Binna Burra.
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At the D’Aguilar Range’s northern end, this huge expanse of rainforest and eucalypt forest in Mount Mee Forest Reserve contains clear creeks, and lookouts with lovely views. Beginning at the Gantry, this mind-calming walk contains beautiful open forests, scribbly gum forests, rainforest remnants, hoop pine plantations and picturesque creek scenery. About halfway along, enjoy the magnificent views to the west, overlooking Somerset and Wivenhoe Dams. On your return, enjoy a picnic at the Gantry picnic area where the remains of the old sawmill that operated here until 1981 can still be seen.
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Bellthorpe National Park is at the southern end of the Conondale Range. Rugged bush land with rainforest, waterfalls and attractive creeks is home to a large number of plant species and a haven for many endangered and threatened animals. Picnic beside a rock pool at the Stony Creek day-use area. Look for frogs and lizards around the rock pools. Identify the many forest birds. There are no formal walking tracks but visitors can walk along the forest roads; which are also used for horse riding, mountain-bike riding and four-wheel driving. Visitors need to be well prepared and self-sufficient.
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Towering 560 metres high, this park is a green oasis, offering glimpses of the Pacific Ocean and Gold Coast skyline to the east and national parks of the Scenic Rim to the west. The park includes Witches Falls (which in 1908 became Queensland's first national park) and Cedar Grove, The Knoll and Palm Grove sections. The mountain features basalt columns, cliffs, rocky outcrops, numerous waterfalls and lush rainforest. It is also home to the rare Albert's lyrebird and shining burrawang. Explore some of the park's nine walking tracks that lead to scenic views, beautiful waterfalls, forests of large red cedars and groves of tall piccabeen palms. At Curtis Falls, sit quietly in the early morning or late afternoon for a chance to spot a platypus. Enjoy a picnic at The Knoll or Witches Falls. Catch a glimpse of the near threatened Albert's lyrebird or hear it mimicking calls of other birds, particularly during the winter months.
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